( 2 pages) Summary & Strong Response Essay – I need Two version of this assignmnet

I need two different copy of this assignment. One copy for me and another copy for my fried. We are in the same class and same teacher.Summary & Strong Response EssayPurpose:Most of us use critical reading strategies every day to effectively process all of the information we are consistently bombarded with. This assignment allows you to continue to explore ideas of reading and writing rhetorically, as you will use different strategies to write your summary and your strong response.The Assignment:This assignment will have two parts:1) SummarySummarize in 150-200 words the article your instructor has chosen from the assignment: “Children Need to Play, Not Compete,” In this summary, you should relay the article’s main points, completely and accurately, in your own words. If you find yourself in a situation in which the author’s words needed to be quoted directly (perhaps for emphasis), you must make it clear that these words are the author’s by using quotation marks appropriately. You will not want to quote anything over one sentence in length, and you will want to limit yourself to no more than 2-3 direct quotes, if you use any at all. Remember that the whole point of this portion of the assignment is for you to restate the author’s points objectively in your own words.In general, I recommend you structure your first sentence something like this:In “Children Need to Play, Not Compete, Jessica Statsky…This will function as the thesis statement of your summary, so this first sentence will need to convey the main point(s) of the article to give your reader an overall view.2) ResponseWrite a full, rough draft of your strong response to “Children Need to Play, Not Compete.” This response should be at least 400-500 words (roughly 1.5-2 pages) in length. Please keep in mind the following: Before you even begin drafting, you will want to decide on the terms of your response. Once you decide on the terms (or grounds) of your response, you’ll want to figure out how you can support your points—using logic, outside evidence, examples from your personal life—whatever is appropriate.
summary___strong_response_essay___3_.docx

jessica_statsky__children_need_to_play__not_compete__3_.pdf

Don't use plagiarized sources. Get Your Custom Essay on
( 2 pages) Summary & Strong Response Essay – I need Two version of this assignmnet
Just from $13/Page
Order Essay

Unformatted Attachment Preview

Summary & Strong Response Essay
Purpose:
Most of us use critical reading strategies every day to effectively process all of the information we
are consistently bombarded with. This assignment allows you to continue to explore ideas of
reading and writing rhetorically, as you will use different strategies to write your summary and
your strong response.
The Assignment:
This assignment will have two parts:
1) Summary
Summarize in 150-200 words the article your instructor has chosen from the assignment: “Children
Need to Play, Not Compete,” In this summary, you should relay the article’s main points,
completely and accurately, in your own words. If you find yourself in a situation in which the
author’s words needed to be quoted directly (perhaps for emphasis), you must make it clear that
these words are the author’s by using quotation marks appropriately. You will not want to quote
anything over one sentence in length, and you will want to limit yourself to no more than 2-3
direct quotes, if you use any at all. Remember that the whole point of this portion of the
assignment is for you to restate the author’s points objectively in your own words.
In general, I recommend you structure your first sentence something like this:
In “Children Need to Play, Not Compete, Jessica Statsky…
This will function as the thesis statement of your summary, so this first sentence will need to
convey the main point(s) of the article to give your reader an overall view.
2) Response
Write a full, rough draft of your strong response to “Children Need to Play, Not Compete.” This
response should be at least 400-500 words (roughly 1.5-2 pages) in length. Please keep in mind
the following: Before you even begin drafting, you will want to decide on the terms of your
response. Once you decide on the terms (or grounds) of your response, you’ll want to figure out
how you can support your points—using logic, outside evidence, examples from your personal
life—whatever is appropriate.
250
CHAPTER 6
Arguing a Position
Readings
Jessica Statsky
To see how Jessica Statsky
developed her response to
readers’ likely objections,
see A Writer at Work on
pp. 292–94. If you could
have given Statsky advice in
a peer review of her drafts,
what objections would you
have advised her to respond
to, and how do you think
she could have responded?
Children Need to Play, Not Compete
THIS ESSAY by Jessica Statsky about children’s competitive sports was written for a col
lege composition course. When you were a child, you may have had experience playing
competitive sports, in or out of school, for example in Peewee Football, Little League
Baseball, American Youth Soccer, or some other organization. Or you may have had rela
tives or friends who were deeply involved in sports. As you read, consider the following:
2? m?¨p£?F§zFaFm3F?!m=?p)?F¥!?apm:?¦!??¦ammamV?£m=£d¨?Fhz^!?aªF=?p?¦!??hpF?
value placed on having a good time, learning to get along with others, developing
athletic skills, or something else altogether?
2? ^F??£F??apm??am??^F?h!Vam9? p£?am??£3?p?h!¨?!?c?¨p£??p?zp???¨p£?!m?¦F???p?!?
class blog or discussion board or to bring them to class.
Basic Features
A Focused,
8FMM 1SFTFOUFE *TTVF
1
“Organized sports for young people have become an institution in North
America,” reports sports journalist Steve Silverman, attracting more than 44 million
” 8FMM 4VQQPSUFE 1PTJUJPO
youngsters according to a recent survey by the National Council of Youth Sports
An Effective Response to
Opposing Views
(“History”). Though many adults regard Little League Baseball and Peewee Football
A Clear, Logical
Organization
as a basic part of childhood, the games are not always joyous ones. When
overzealous parents and coaches impose adult standards on children’s sports, the
How does Statsky present
the issue in a way that
prepares readers for her
argument?
result can be activities that are neither satisfying nor beneficial to children.
2
I am concerned about all organized sports activities for children between the
ages of six and twelve. The damage I see results from noncontact as well as contact
sports, from sports organized locally as well as those organized nationally. Highly
How does she qualify her
position in par. 2?
organized competitive sports such as Peewee Football and Little League Baseball
What reasons does she
forecast here, and in which
paragraphs does she dis
cuss each reason? Do her
reasons appeal primarily to
readers’ intellect (logos), to
their sense of fairness and
what’s credible (pathos), or
to their feelings (ethos)?
for children and can be both physically and psychologically harmful. Furthermore,
are too often played to adult standards, which are developmentally inappropriate
because they eliminate many children from organized sports before they are ready to
compete, they are actually counterproductive for developing either future players or
fans. Finally, because they emphasize competition and winning, they unfortunately
provide occasions for some parents and coaches to place their own fantasies and
needs ahead of children’s welfare.
Statsky
3
Children Need to Play, Not Compete
GUIDE TO READING
GUIDE TO WRITING
A WRITER AT WORK
THINKING CRITICALLY
251
One readily understandable danger of overly competitive sports is that they
entice children into physical actions that are bad for growing bodies. “There is a
growing epidemic of preventable youth sports injuries,” according to the STOP
Sports Injuries campaign. “Among athletes ages 5 to 14, 28 percent of football
players, 25 percent of baseball players, 22 percent of soccer players, 15 percent of
basketball players, and 12 percent of softball players were injured while playing their
respective sports.” Although the official Little League Web site acknowledges that
children do risk injury playing baseball, it insists that “severe injuries . . .
are infrequent,” the risk “far less than the risk of riding a skateboard, a bicycle, or
even the school bus” (“What about My Child?”). Nevertheless, Leonard Koppett in
Sports Illusion, Sports Reality DMBJNT UIBU B UXFMWF ZFBS PME USZJOH UP UISPX B DVSWF
ball, for example, may put abnormal strain on developing arm and shoulder muscles,
How does Statsky try to
establish the credibility of
her sources in pars. 3–5
(ethos)?
sometimes resulting in lifelong injuries (294). Contact sports like football can be
even more hazardous. Thomas Tutko, a psychology professor at San Jose State
University and coauthor of the book Winning Is Everything and Other American Myths,
writes:
I am strongly opposed to young kids playing tackle football. It is not the
right stage of development for them to be taught to crash into other kids.
Kids under the age of fourteen are not by nature physical. Their main
DPODFSO JT TFMG QSFTFSWBUJPO 5IFZ EPO U XBOU UP NFFU IFBE PO BOE TMBN
into each other. But tackle football absolutely requires that they try to hit
each other as hard as they can. And it is too traumatic for young kids.
(qtd. in Tosches A1)
4
As Tutko indicates, even when children are not injured, fear of being hurt
detracts from their enjoyment of the sport. The Little League Web site ranks fear
of injury as the seventh of seven reasons children quit (“What about My Child?”).
0OF NPUIFS PG BO FJHIU ZFBS PME 1FFXFF ‘PPUCBMM QMBZFS explained, “The kids get so
scared. They get hit once and they don’t want anything to do with football anymore.
They’ll sit on the bench and pretend their leg hurts . . . ” (qtd. in Tosches A1). Some
children are driven to even more desperate measures. For example, in one Peewee
Football game, a reporter watched the following scene as a player took himself out
of the game:
Why do you think she
uses block quotations
instead of integrating
these quotes into her own
sentences?
252
CHAPTER 6
Arguing a Position
“Coach, my tummy hurts. I can’t play,” he said. The coach told the player
to get back onto the field. “There’s nothing wrong with your stomach,” he
TBJE 8IFO UIF DPBDI UVSOFE IJT IFBE UIF TFWFO ZFBS PME TUVDL B GJOHFS EPXO
his throat and made himself vomit. When the coach turned back, the boy
pointed to the ground and told him, “Yes there is, coach. See?” (Tosches A33)
5
Besides physical hazards and anxieties, competitive sports pose psychological
dangers for children. Martin Rablovsky, a former sports editor for the New York Times,
says that in all his years of watching young children play organized sports, he has
OPUJDFE WFSZ GFX PG UIFN TNJMJOH i* WF TFFO DIJMESFO FOKPZJOH B TQPOUBOFPVT QSF
practice scrimmage become somber and serious when the coach’s whistle blows,”
Rablovsky says. “The spirit of play suddenly disappears, and sport becomes joblike”
(qtd. in Coakley 94). The primary goal of a professional athlete — winning — is not
appropriate for children. Their goals should be having fun, learning, and being with
friends. Although winning does add to the fun, too many adults lose sight of what
matters and make winning the most important goal. Several studies have shown
that when children are asked whether they would rather be warming the bench on
a winning team or playing regularly on a losing team, about 90 percent choose the
latter (Smith, Smith, and Smoll 11).
How does Statsky try to
refute this objection?
6
Winning and losing may be an inevitable part of adult life, but they should
not be part of childhood. Too much competition too early in life can affect a child’s
development. Children are easily influenced, and when they sense that their compe
tence and worth are based on their ability to live up to their parents’ and coaches’
high expectations — and on their ability to win — they can become discouraged and
depressed. Little League advises parents to “keep winning in perspective” (“Your
Role”), noting that the most common reasons children give for quitting, aside from
change in interest, are lack of playing time, failure and fear of failure, disapproval
by significant others, and psychological stress (“What about My Child?”). According
to Dr. Glyn C. Roberts, a professor of kinesiology at the Institute of Child Behavior
and Development at the University of Illinois, 80 to 90 percent of children who play
competitive sports at a young age drop out by sixteen (Kutner).
How effective do you
think Statsky’s argument
in par. 7 is? Why?
7
5IJT TUBUJTUJD JMMVTUSBUFT BOPUIFS SFBTPO * PQQPTF DPNQFUJUJWF TQPSUT GPS DIJM
dren: because they are so highly selective, very few children get to participate. Far
Statsky
Children Need to Play, Not Compete
GUIDE TO READING
GUIDE TO WRITING
A WRITER AT WORK
THINKING CRITICALLY
253
too soon, a few children are singled out for their athletic promise, while many
others, who may be on the verge of developing the necessary strength and
ability, are screened out and discouraged from trying out again. Like adults,
children fear failure, and so even those with good physical skills may stay away
CFDBVTF UIFZ MBDL TFMG DPOGJEFODF $POTFRVFOUMZ UFBNT MPTF NBOZ QSPNJTJOH
players who with some encouragement and experience might have become stars.
5IF QSPCMFN JT UIBU NBOZ QBSFOU TQPOTPSFE PVU PG TDIPPM QSPHSBNT HJWF NPSF
importance to having a winning team than to developing children’s physical skills
BOE TFMG FTUFFN
8
Indeed, it is no secret that too often scorekeeping, league standings, and the
drive to win bring out the worst in adults who are more absorbed in living out their
own fantasies than in enhancing the quality of the experience for children (Smith,
Smith, and Smoll 9). Recent newspaper articles on children’s sports contain plenty of
horror stories. Los Angeles Times reporter Rich Tosches, for example, tells the story
PG B CSBXM BNPOH TFWFOUZ GJWF QBSFOUT GPMMPXJOH B 1FFXFF ‘PPUCBMM HBNF ” “T
a result of the brawl, which began when a parent from one team confronted a player
from the other team, the teams are now thinking of hiring security guards for future
games. Another example is provided by a Los Angeles Times editorial about a Little
League manager who intimidated the opposing team by setting fire to one of their
team’s jerseys on the pitcher’s mound before the game began. As the editorial writer
commented, the manager showed his young team that “intimidation could substitute
for playing well” (“The Bad News”).
9
Although not all parents or coaches behave so inappropriately, the seriousness
of the problem is illustrated by the fact that Adelphi University in Garden City, New
York, offers a sports psychology workshop for Little League coaches, designed to
balance their “animal instincts” with “educational theory” in hopes of reducing the
“screaming and hollering,” in the words of Harold Weisman, manager of sixteen Little
-FBHVFT JO /FX :PSL $JUZ 4DINJUU *O B UISFF BOE POF IBMG IPVS 4VOEBZ NPSO
ing workshop, coaches learn how to make practices more fun, treat injuries, deal
with irate parents, and be “more sensitive to their young players’ fears, emotional
frailties, and need for recognition.” Little League is to be credited with recognizing
the need for such workshops.
In criticizing some parents’
behavior in pars. 8–9,
Statsky risks alienating her
readers. How effective is
this part of her argument?
254
CHAPTER 6
Arguing a Position
How effective is Statsky’s
use of concession and
refutation here?
10
Some parents would no doubt argue that children cannot start too soon prepar
JOH UP MJWF JO B DPNQFUJUJWF GSFF NBSLFU FDPOPNZ After all, secondary schools and
colleges require students to compete for grades, and college admission is extremely
competitive. And it is perfectly obvious how important competitive skills are in
finding a job. Yet the ability to cooperate is also important for success in life.
Before children are psychologically ready for competition, maybe we should empha
size cooperation and individual performance in team sports rather than winning.
11
Many people are ready for such an emphasis. In 1988, one New York Little League
PGGJDJBM XIP IBE BUUFOEFE UIF “EFMQIJ XPSLTIPQ USJFE UP CBO TDPSJOH GSPN TJY UP
FJHIU ZFBS PMET HBNFT — but parents wouldn’t support him (Schmitt). An innovative
children’s sports program in New York City, City Sports for Kids, emphasizes fitness,
TFMG FTUFFN BOE TQPSUTNBOTIJQ *O UIJT QSPHSBN T CBTLFUCBMM HBNFT FWFSZ NFNCFS PO
B UFBN QMBZT BU MFBTU UXP PG TJY FJHIU NJOVUF QFSJPET 5IF CBTLFU JT TFWFO GFFU GSPN
the floor, rather than ten feet, and a player can score a point just by hitting the rim
(Bloch). I believe this kind of local program should replace overly competitive programs
like Peewee Football and Little League Baseball. As one coach explains, significant
improvements can result from a few simple rule changes, such as including every player
in the batting order and giving every player, regardless of age or ability, the opportunity
to play at least four innings a game (Frank).
How effectively does
Statsky conclude her
argument?
12
Some children want to play competitive sports; they are not being forced to
play. These children are eager to learn skills, to enjoy the camaraderie of the team,
BOE FBSO TFMG SFTQFDU CZ USZJOH IBSE UP CFOFGJU UIFJS UFBN * BDLOPXMFEHF UIBU TPNF
children may benefit from playing competitive sports. While some children do benefit
from these programs, however, many more would benefit from programs that avoid
the excesses and dangers of many competitive sports programs and instead empha
size fitness, cooperation, sportsmanship, and individual performance.
Are Statsky’s sources
adequate to support
her position, in number
and kind? Has she
documented them clearly
and accurately?
Works Cited
“The Bad News Pyromaniacs?” Editorial. Los Angeles Times 16 June 1990: B6.
LexisNexis. Web. 16 May 2008.
Bloch, Gordon B. “Thrill of Victory Is Secondary to Fun.” New York Times 2 Apr. 1990,
late ed.: C12. LexisNexis. Web. 14 May 2008.
Coakley, Jay J. Sport in Society: Issues and Controversies. St. Louis: Mosby, 1982. Print.

Purchase answer to see full
attachment

Order a unique copy of this paper
(550 words)

Approximate price: $22

Basic features
  • Free title page and bibliography
  • Unlimited revisions
  • Plagiarism-free guarantee
  • Money-back guarantee
  • 24/7 support
On-demand options
  • Writer’s samples
  • Part-by-part delivery
  • Overnight delivery
  • Copies of used sources
  • Expert Proofreading
Paper format
  • 275 words per page
  • 12 pt Arial/Times New Roman
  • Double line spacing
  • Any citation style (APA, MLA, Chicago/Turabian, Harvard)

Our guarantees

Delivering a high-quality product at a reasonable price is not enough anymore.
That’s why we have developed 5 beneficial guarantees that will make your experience with our service enjoyable, easy, and safe.

Money-back guarantee

You have to be 100% sure of the quality of your product to give a money-back guarantee. This describes us perfectly. Make sure that this guarantee is totally transparent.

Read more

Zero-plagiarism guarantee

Each paper is composed from scratch, according to your instructions. It is then checked by our plagiarism-detection software. There is no gap where plagiarism could squeeze in.

Read more

Free-revision policy

Thanks to our free revisions, there is no way for you to be unsatisfied. We will work on your paper until you are completely happy with the result.

Read more

Privacy policy

Your email is safe, as we store it according to international data protection rules. Your bank details are secure, as we use only reliable payment systems.

Read more

Fair-cooperation guarantee

By sending us your money, you buy the service we provide. Check out our terms and conditions if you prefer business talks to be laid out in official language.

Read more

Calculate the price of your order

550 words
We'll send you the first draft for approval by September 11, 2018 at 10:52 AM
Total price:
$26
The price is based on these factors:
Academic level
Number of pages
Urgency

Order your essay today and save 15% with the discount code DISCOUNT15