A paper that explains and compares the southern rationale of paternalism and pro-slavery ideology with the realities of chattel bondage

In what ways did Frederick Douglass use the narrative of his experience as a slave to challenge defenses of slavery? You will need to carefully read CHAPTER 11 THE PECULIAR INSTITUTION in GIVE ME LIBERTY! VOL. 1 ( which will be uploaded) for definitions and examples of both paternalism and proslavery arguments. Think about the subtle differences between the two ideologies, and how Douglass disputed them both. identify and analyze at least FOUR significant example from “The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass”(which would also be uploaded)
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THE NARRATIVE OF THE LIFE OF FREDERICK
DOUGLASS: AN AMERICAN SLAVE
WEBSTER’S GERMAN THESAURUS EDITION
for ESL, EFL, ELP, TOFEL®, TOEIC®, and AP® Test Preparation
FREDERICK DOUGLASS
TOEFL?, TOEIC?, AP? and Advanced Placement? are trademarks of the Educational Testing Service which has
neither reviewed nor endorsed this book. All rights reserved.
The Narrative of the Life of Frederick
Douglass: An American Slave
Webster’s German
Thesaurus Edition
for ESL, EFL, ELP, TOFEL®, TOEIC®, and AP® Test Preparation
Frederick Douglass
TOEFL®, TOEIC®, AP® and Advanced Placement® are trademarks of the Educational Testing Service which
has neither reviewed nor endorsed this book. All rights reserved.
ii
ICON CLASSICS
Published by ICON Group International, Inc.
7404 Trade Street
San Diego, CA 92121 USA
www.icongrouponline.com
The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: Webster’s German Thesaurus Edition for ESL, EFL,
ELP, TOFEL®, TOEIC®, and AP® Test Preparation
This edition published by ICON Classics in 2005
Printed in the United States of America.
Copyright ©2005 by ICON Group International, Inc.
Edited by Philip M. Parker, Ph.D. (INSEAD); Copyright ©2005, all rights reserved.
All rights reserved. This book is protected by copyright. No part of it may be reproduced, stored in a
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TOEFL®, TOEIC®, AP® and Advanced Placement® are trademarks of the Educational Testing
Service which has neither reviewed nor endorsed this book. All rights reserved.
ISBN 0-497-25762-9
iii
Contents
Frederick Douglass ……………………………………………………………………… 1
PREFACE FROM THE EDITOR ……………………………………………………………………………… 1
PREFACE………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 3
LETTER FROM WENDELL PHILLIPS, ESQ……………………………………………………………. 12
CHAPTER I ……………………………………………………………………………………………………… 16
CHAPTER II …………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 21
CHAPTER III ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 27
CHAPTER IV ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 31
CHAPTER V …………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 36
CHAPTER VI ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 41
CHAPTER VII …………………………………………………………………………………………………… 45
CHAPTER VIII ………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 51
CHAPTER IX ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 56
CHAPTER X …………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 61
CHAPTER XI ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 90
APPENDIX …………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 103
GLOSSARY ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 110
The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass
1
PREFACE FROM THE EDITOR
Webster’s paperbacks take advantage of the fact that classics are frequently assigned readings in
English courses. By using a running English-to-German thesaurus at the bottom of each page, this
edition of The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave by Frederick
Douglass was edited for three audiences. The first includes German-speaking students enrolled in
an English Language Program (ELP), an English as a Foreign Language (EFL) program, an English
as a Second Language Program (ESL), or in a TOEFL® or TOEIC® preparation program. The
second audience includes English-speaking students enrolled in bilingual education programs or
German speakers enrolled in English speaking schools. The third audience consists of students who
are actively building their vocabularies in German in order to take foreign service, translation
certification, Advanced Placement® (AP®)1 or similar examinations. By using the Rosetta Edition®
when assigned for an English course, the reader can enrich their vocabulary in anticipation of an
examination in German or English.
Webster’s edition of this classic is organized to expose the reader to a maximum number of
difficult and potentially ambiguous English words. Rare or idiosyncratic words and expressions are
given lower priority compared to “difficult, yet commonly used” words. Rather than supply a single
translation, many words are translated for a variety of meanings in German, allowing readers to
better grasp the ambiguity of English, and avoid them using the notes as a pure translation crutch.
Having the reader decipher a word’s meaning within context serves to improve vocabulary
retention and understanding. Each page covers words not already highlighted on previous pages. If
a difficult word is not translated on a page, chances are that it has been translated on a previous
page. A more complete glossary of translations is supplied at the end of the book; translations are
extracted from Webster’s Online Dictionary.
Definitions of remaining terms as well as translations can be found at www.websters-onlinedictionary.org. Please send suggestions to websters@icongroupbooks.com
The Editor
Webster’s Online Dictionary
www.websters-online-dictionary.org
1 TOEFL®, TOEIC®, AP® and Advanced Placement® are trademarks of the Educational Testing Service
which has neither reviewed nor endorsed this book. All rights reserved.
2
Frederick Douglass
Frederick Douglass was born in slavery as Frederick Augustus Washington
Bailey near Easton in Talbot County, Maryland. He was not sure of the exact
year of his birth, but he knew that it was 1817 or 1818. As a young boy he was
sent to Baltimore, to be a house servant, where he learned to read and write, with
the assistance of his master’s wife. In 1838 he escaped from slavery and went to
New York City, where he married Anna Murray, a free colored woman whom he
had met in Baltimore. Soon thereafter he changed his name to Frederick
Douglass. In 1841 he addressed a convention of the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery
Society in Nantucket and so greatly impressed the group that they immediately
employed him as an agent. He was such an impressive orator that numerous
persons doubted if he had ever been a slave, so he wrote NARRATIVE OF THE
LIFE OF FREDERICK DOUGLASS. During the Civil War he assisted in the
recruiting of colored men for the 54th and 55th Massachusetts Regiments and
consistently argued for the emancipation of slaves. After the war he was active
in securing and protecting the rights of the freemen. In his later years, at
different times, he was secretary of the Santo Domingo Commission, marshall
and recorder of deeds of the District of Columbia, and United States Minister to
Haiti. His other autobiographical works are MY BONDAGE AND MY
FREEDOM and LIFE AND TIMES OF FREDERICK DOUGLASS, published in
1855 and 1881 respectively. He died in 1895.
The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass
3
PREFACE
In%the month of August, 1841, I attended an anti-slavery convention in
Nantucket, at which it was my happiness to become acquainted with
FREDERICK DOUGLASS, the writer of the following Narrative. He was a
stranger to nearly every member of that body; but, having recently made his
escape from the southern prison-house of bondage, and feeling his curiosity
excited to ascertain the principles and measures of the abolitionists,—of whom
he had heard a somewhat vague description while he was a slave,—he was
induced to give his attendance, on the occasion alluded to, though at that time a
resident in New Bedford.
Fortunate, most fortunate occurrence!—fortunate for the millions of his
manacled brethren, yet panting for deliverance from their awful thraldom!—
fortunate for the cause of negro emancipation, and of universal liberty!—
fortunate for the land of his birth, which he has already done so much to save
and bless!—fortunate for a large circle of friends and acquaintances, whose
sympathy and affection he has strongly secured by the many sufferings he has
endured, by his virtuous traits of character, by his ever-abiding remembrance of
those who are in bonds, as being bound with them!—fortunate for the
multitudes, in various parts of our republic, whose minds he has enlightened on
the subject of slavery, and who have been melted to tears by his pathos, or
roused to virtuous indignation by his stirring eloquence against the enslavers of
men!—fortunate for himself, as it at once brought him into the field of public
German
acquaintances: Bekannte,
Bekanntschaften, die Bekanntschaft,
Reisebekanntschaften.
acquainted: bekannt, mitgeteilt, teilte
mit, teilten mit, teiltest mit, teiltet
mit.
alluded: angespielt, spieltet an,
spieltest an, spielten an, spielte an,
wies hin.
bondage: Hörigkeit, Sklaverei,
Leibeigenschaft, Knechtschaft.
brethren: Bruder, Brüder.
deliverance: Befreiung.
eloquence: Beredsamkeit,
Sprachgewandtheit,
Redegewandtheit, Außdruckskraft.
endured: ertragen, ertrug, ertrugen,
ertrugst, ertrugt, hieltet aus,
ausgehalten, hielt aus, hielten aus,
hieltest aus, erduldetet.
enlightened: erleuchtetet,
erleuchtetest, erleuchteten,
erleuchtete, erleuchtet, Aufgeklärt.
multitudes: Mengen.
negro: Neger, Farbige, Schwarze.
panting: Keuchend.
pathos: das Pathos, Pathos.
remembrance: Erinnerung, Andenken,
Gedächtnis, Memorandum,
Mahnung, Abberufung,
Erinnerungsvermögen,
Denkwürdigkeit, Denkschrift.
roused: geweckt, weckten, wecktest,
weckte, wecktet.
sufferings: Leidet.
virtuous: tugendhaft.
4
Frederick Douglass
usefulness, “gave %the world assurance of a MAN,” quickened the slumbering
energies of his soul, and consecrated him to the great work of breaking the rod of
the oppressor, and letting the oppressed go free!
I shall never forget his first speech at the convention—the extraordinary
emotion it excited in my own mind—the powerful impression it created upon a
crowded auditory, completely taken by surprise—the applause which followed
from the beginning to the end of his felicitous remarks. I think I never hated
slavery so intensely as at that moment; certainly, my perception of the enormous
outrage which is inflicted by it, on the godlike nature of its victims, was
rendered far more clear than ever. There stood one, in physical proportion and
stature commanding and exact—in intellect richly endowed—in natural
eloquence a prodigy—in soul manifestly “created but a little lower than the
angels”—yet a slave, ay, a fugitive slave,—trembling for his safety, hardly
daring to believe that on the American soil, a single white person could be found
who would befriend him at all hazards, for the love of God and humanity!
Capable of high attainments as an intellectual and moral being—needing
nothing but a comparatively small amount of cultivation to make him an
ornament to society and a blessing to his race—by the law of the land, by the
voice of the people, by the terms of the slave code, he was only a piece of
property, a beast of burden, a chattel personal, nevertheless!
A beloved friend from New Bedford prevailed on Mr. DOUGLASS to address
the convention: He came forward to the platform with a hesitancy and
embarrassment, necessarily the attendants of a sensitive mind in such a novel
position. After apologizing for his ignorance, and reminding the audience that
slavery was a poor school for the human intellect and heart, he proceeded to
narrate some of the facts in his own history as a slave, and in the course of his
speech gave utterance to many noble thoughts and thrilling reflections. As soon
as he had taken his seat, filled with hope and admiration, I rose, and declared
that PATRICK HENRY, of revolutionary fame, never made a speech more
eloquent in the cause of liberty, than the one we had just listened to from the lips
of that hunted fugitive. So I believed at that time—such is my belief now. I
German
apologizing: entschuldigend.
attainments: Erreichungen,
Erwerbung, Fähigkeit, Fertigkeit,
Kenntnisse, Erreichung.
attendants: Aufseher, Aufpasser,
Concierges, Hausmeister, Babysitter.
auditory: auditiv, Auditorium,
Zuhörerschaft, Hörsaal.
ay: ja.
befriend: behilflich sein, freundlich
sein.
chattel: Habe.
consecrated: segnete.
felicitous: glücklich, treffend,
gelungen.
fugitive: Flüchtling, Flüchtig.
godlike: gottähnlich, göttlich.
hesitancy: Unschlüssigkeit.
manifestly: offensichtlich,
offenkundig, offenbar, eindeutig.
narrate: erzählen, erzähle, erzählst,
erzählt, melden, sprechen, sagen,
mitteilen, deklamieren, berichten,
austragen.
oppressor: Unterdrücker.
ornament: Verzierung, Verzieren,
Zierat, Ornament, Zierde,
Dekoration, Ausschmückung,
Schmuck, Aufputzen, Ausputzen,
Schmücken.
quickened: beschleunigte,
beschleunigtet, beschleunigtest,
beschleunigt, beschleunigten.
slumbering: schlummernd.
thrilling: spannend, aufregend,
durchdringend.
The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass
5
reminded the audience of the peril which surrounded this self-emancipated
young man at the North,—even in Massachusetts, on the soil of the Pilgrim
Fathers, among the descendants of revolutionary sires; and I appealed to them,
whether they would ever allow him to be carried back into slavery,—law or no
law, constitution or no constitution. The response was unanimous and in
thunder-tones—”NO!” “Will you succor and protect him as a brother-man—a
resident of the old Bay State?” “YES!” shouted the whole mass, with an energy
so startling, that the ruthless tyrants south of Mason and Dixon’s line might
almost have heard the mighty burst of feeling, and recognized it as the pledge of
an invincible determination, on the part of those who gave it, never to betray
him that wanders, but to hide the outcast, and firmly to abide the
consequences.%
It was at once deeply impressed upon my mind, that, if Mr. DOUGLASS
could be persuaded to consecrate his time and talents to the promotion of the
anti-slavery enterprise, a powerful impetus would be given to it, and a stunning
blow at the same time inflicted on northern prejudice against a colored
complexion. I therefore endeavored to instil hope and courage into his mind, in
order that he might dare to engage in a vocation so anomalous and responsible
for a person in his situation; and I was seconded in this effort by warm-hearted
friends, especially by the late General Agent of the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery
Society, Mr. JOHN A. COLLINS, whose judgment in this instance entirely
coincided with my own. At first, he could give no encouragement; with
unfeigned diffidence, he expressed his conviction that he was not adequate to
the performance of so great a task; the path marked out was wholly an
untrodden one; he was sincerely apprehensive that he should do more harm
than good. After much deliberation, however, he consented to make a trial; and
ever since that period, he has acted as a lecturing agent, under the auspices
either of the American or the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society. In labors he
has been most abundant; and his success in combating prejudice, in gaining
proselytes, in agitating the public mind, has far surpassed the most sanguine
expectations that were raised at the commencement of his brilliant career. He
has borne himself with gentleness and meekness, yet with true manliness of
German
agitating: aufregend, beunruhigend,
agitierend, Handeln, Agieren.
colored: farbig, bunt, farbige.
combating: bekämpfen, bekämpfend.
consecrate: weihen, inaugurieren,
initiieren, einsegnen, einweihen.
consented: zugestimmt.
diffidence: Schüchternheit.
endeavored: bemühte.
instil: einschärfen.
invincible: unbesiegbar.
labors: Arbeiten.
lecturing: Vorlesend, Einen Vortrag
haltend.
manliness: Mannhaftigkeit,
Männlichkeit, Unerschrockenheit.
meekness: Sanftmut, Gleichmutigkeit,
Gelassenheit.
outcast: Ausgestoßene, Paria,
Verstoßene, Ausgestoßenen,
Verworfene.
proselytes: Bekehrt.
sanguine: heiter, optimistisch.
sires: Vorfahren.
succor: Beistand, beistehen, die Hilfe,
Hilfe.
surpassed: übertrafst, übertrafen,
übertraft, übertroffen, übertraf,
übergeragt, ragte über, ragten über,
ragtest über, ragtet über,
überflügelte.
tyrants: Despoten.
unfeigned: echt, ungeheuchelt.
untrodden: unbetreten, nicht
zugänglich, unberührt.
wanders: Wandert, irrt.
6
Frederick Douglass
character. As a public speaker, he excels in pathos, wit, comparison, imitation,
strength of reasoning, and fluency of language. There is in him that union of
head and heart, which is indispensable to an enlightenment of the heads and a
winning of the hearts of others. May his strength continue to be equal to his day!
May he continue to “grow in grace, and in the knowledge of God,” that he may
be increasingly serviceable in the cause of bleeding humanity, whether at home
or abroad!
It is certainly a very remarkable fact, that one of the most efficient advocates
of the slave population, now before the public, is a fugitive slave, in the person of
FREDERICK DOUGLASS; and that the free colored population of the United
States are as ably represented by one of their own number, in the person of
CHARLES LENOX REMOND, whose eloquent appeals have extorted the highest
applause of multitudes on both sides of the Atlantic. Let the calumniators of the
colored race despise themselves for their baseness and illiberality of spirit, and
henceforth cease to talk of the natural inferiority of those who require nothing
but time and opportunity to attain to the highest point of human excellence.%
It may, perhaps, be fairly questioned, whether any other portion of the
population of the earth could have endured the privations, sufferings and
horrors of slavery, without having become more degraded in the scale of
humanity than the slaves of African descent. Nothing has been left undone to
cripple their intellects, darken their minds, debase their moral nature, obliterate
all traces of their relationship to mankind; and yet how wonderfully they have
sustained the mighty load of a most frightful bondage, under which they have
been groaning for centuries! To illustrate the effect of slavery on the white
man,—to show that he has no powers of endurance, in such a condition, superior
to those of his black brother,—DANIEL O’CONNELL, the distinguished
advocate of universal emancipation, and the mightiest champion of prostrate
but not conquered Ireland, relates the following anecdote in a speech delivered
by him in the Conciliation Hall, Dublin, before the Loyal National Repeal
Association, March 31, 18 …
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