Analyze essay about monesters

Write analyze essay 7-8 pages + work cited page / the theses is I AGREE WITH COHEN’S THESES AND I CHOOSE FIRST, SECOND, AND SIXTH THESES,and I sent summary about them with sample essay.These are the sourcesKing Horror Movies.pdfScience of Monsters Intro.pdfFrankenstein.pdfThe three sources must be in addition to Cohen’s theses.By using them find
others who agree with you! Your outside sources should be connected to your
monsters in that they support your understanding of the monsters you have
chosen.
Including vivid and specific details when describing the monsters you have chosen,
and tie your examples to Cohen’s theses. (you do NOT have to address all seven
of his theses, only the ones that apply to your monsters).
Synthesizing by combing information from
different sources to inform and support
a greater understanding of your argument.
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SAMPEL ESSAY
Reality of Monsters
What are monsters? Are they humans? Are they harmful? Do they die? The answer to
these questions is, it depends. Ever since we were born, we keep hearing stories about the good
and the evil, the hero and the villain, the friend and the enemy, and last but not least, the monster
and the human. There are so many different types of monsters that have different characteristics
and personalities. Though monsters are generally fictional, there is a great possibility that real
humans can turn out to be monsters too. In Monster Culture (Seven Theses), written by Jeffery
Jerome Cohen, there are seven theories about monsters that Cohen widely discusses and
analyzes. The purpose of his analysis is to read and understand cultures based on what monsters
they create and believe in. “I offer seven theses toward understanding cultures through the
monsters they bear.” (Cohen 4). Cohen’s seven theses are true and valid, and I absolutely agree
with most of them. I think that analyzing monsters is in fact an effective way of reading society,
especially is these monsters appeared in more than one time period.
In Monster Culture (Seven Theses), Chen begins explaining his first theory on how the
monster’s body is a cultural body. He claims that the monster is born at this “crossroad” where
all the differences meet to symbolize something other than itself. “The monster’s body quite
literally incorporates fear, desire, anxiety, and fantasy, giving them life and uncanny
independence.” (Cohen 4). His second theses is that the monster always escapes. He argues that
no matter how many times you try to kill a monster, they can never be defeated. They may
vanish, but only to be born again somewhere else. He then goes on with his argument in the third
theses where he states that the monster always escapes because it refuses easy categorization.
(Cohen 6). In other words, it is very tough determine which category a monster is. It could be
classified as a mix of both animals and humans or none. The fourth theses that Cohen discussed
is that the monster dwells at the gate of difference, meaning the monster is an “outsider”. In
addition, outsiders are the ones that don’t belong depending on their culture, race, religion,
sexuality…etc. such as the racial discrimination in the twentieth century when people considered
Ethiopians as sinners because they have darker skin color. (Cohen 10). In the fifth theses, Cohen
affirms that the monster polices the borders of the possible, which means that monsters usually
warn us from exploring and knowing the unknown because curiosity will only lead to horrible
endings for us so we are better off not knowing. Next, Cohen confirms that fear of the monster is
really a kind of desire in his sixth theses. Since monsters are linked to forbidden practices, they
become more attractive to us because they can do what we cannot do, therefore; we watch some
horror movies to give us at least a temporary joy that satisfies our evil side. “The monster
awakens one to the pleasure of the body, to the simple and fleeting joys of being frightened, or
frightened-to the experience of morality and corporality.” (Cohen 17). As Cohen approaches the
seventh theses, he asks if monsters really exist, then he replies, “Surely they must, for if they did
not, how could we?” (Cohen 20). Finally, Cohen’s last theses is that the monster stands at the
threshold… of becoming. This theses indicates that when monsters come back, the make us
reevaluate our culture assumptions and bring out our society’s imperfections. “They ask us why
we have created them.” (Cohen 20).
The first monster that I chose to support Cohen’s argument in his first theses is the Evil
Queen from the popular fairy tale Snow White. As we all know, the Evil Queen is Snow White’s
cruel stepmother that makes everyone in town fear and obey her. She does not care how many
people she kills and hurts because she is very selfish to the point that makes her want to be the
only person with a happy ending, while everyone else suffers from their misery. Cohen mentions
in his first theses, The Monster’s Body is a Cultural Body, that the monstrous body is a pure
representation of a culture and that it signifies something other than itself. (Cohen 4). Looking at
the Evil Queen characteristics and how it was extremely important to her to be the most beautiful
woman and the most adored in town points to how important the outer appearance was back in
their time. “The first time we see the queen we do not actually see her face, but her reflection,
which marks the plot: vanity and appearance are the frame to this story.” (Repes 27). Moreover,
having the Evil Queen as a mean stepmother shows how society believed that a stepmother is
always heartless and uncaring. “As Cashdan puts it – the witchlike nature of the stepmother is
compounded by her use of magic to perform her evil deeds.” (Repes 20). In fact, there were other
fairy tale stories with a cold-hearted stepmother, such as Cinderella, that came out during that
same period of time. As stated by the author, there was a reason why stepmothers started to
appear more in fairy tales. “The constant presence of a stepmother in fairy tales has actually a
historical explanation: a lot of mothers died during labour thus it was a common that the father
would marry again to replace their former wives in order to have someone looking after house
duties and children.” (Repes 20). I believe that the story of Snow White and the Evil Queen is a
great representation of how society was portrayed back then. It revealed the role of a stepmother
and how there were many children suffering from the loss of their mothers. It also showed the
importance of beauty for women and the concept of marrying a woman only means cleaning the
house and take care of children.
The second monster that I have chosen to support Cohen’s second theses, The Monster
Always Escapes, is Rumpelstiltskin from both the fairy tale and the TV show Once Upon A
Time. “Regardless of how many times Sigourney Weaver’s beleaguered Ripley utterly destroys
the ambiguous Alien that stalks her, its monstrous progeny return, ready to stalk again in another
bigger-than-ever sequel.” (Cohen 5). Since monsters are a clear reflection of society, it is very
necessary to analyze their reappearance, especially when they look different than what they used
to. Rumpelstiltskin, from the old fairy tale, is an ugly dwarf that spins straws into gold and uses
his supernatural powers to make deals out of unfortunate situations and get valuable objects in
return. Furthermore, Mr. Gold, also known as Rumpelstiltskin, the dark one, the crocodile, and
the beast from the TV show OUAT, lives in our modern world and has a great knowledge of
dark magic that he also uses to make deals and get prices from the ones in need. No matter how
the ending was in both settings, they both represented two very serious issues in both the old and
the modern society, which are greed and power. The story of Rumpelstiltskin in the fairy tale
shows how the society was unequal and that you are only considered strong if you are wealthy
with power. People strived to get power to be in a better social class, and even when they have it,
they desired more and more. “It is important to note that the king does not exhibit today’s
leadership qualities. Rather, his greediness, evilness, and unjust practices, are part of his
cardboard character; his death threat and his greed are not considered menacing, just part of his
role as king. The reader is able to take at face value the king’s greed and immorality.” (36).
Another example is the miller’s daughter herself when she manipulated Rumpelstiltskin to
become a queen. “In this folktale, the poor miller’s daughter, through deceit and reneging on her
promise, becomes queen, enters the world of wealth and gains social power.” (35). According to
the TV show OUAT, Rumpelstiltskin returns in modern life as Mr. Gold, because as society
changes, monsters also change to become a better fit. Nonetheless, power did not mean being
above everyone because of your social status, power meant having the ability to control people’s
fates with magic. Now, I do believe that in order to become powerful in the show, you have to
have magical powers and know how to use them. But in today’s world, I believe that magic
means education. Mr. Gold is a very powerful and wise man because he is an expert when it
comes to magic. That is also the case in our society, you need to enlighten your mind with
education to become a person with power. Power of knowledge. Because education can also
control the fate of our society.
The third monster that I selected to prove Cohen’s sixth theory, Fear of the Monster Is
Really a Kind of Desire, is Regina, also known as the Evil Queen, from the popular TV series
OUAT. Regina used to be a very sweet young lady, but her mother, Cora, was very controlling.
Cora killed Regina’s lover because she did not want her daughter to be distracted, and told
Regina to keep her eyes on the prize and marry the King so that she can become “the queen.”
Cohen mentions that monsters can be very attractive to some people because they can do
whatever they want. “The monster also attracts. The same creatures who terrify and interdict can
evoke potent escapist fantasies; the linking of monstrosity with the forbidden makes the monster
more appealing as a temporary egress from constraint.” (Cohen 17). This means that some
people feel trapped if they always have people telling them what to do, which makes them look
for a way of freedom. In Regina’s case, learning dark magic was her way to freedom. She went
to the Dark One to teach her so she can stop her mother from controlling her decisions and
interfering with her love life. Little did she know, she was feeding the little monster inside of her
until she started to love the feeling of having powers and doing what she couldn’t do before, and
that led to the creation of the Evil Queen. In today’s world, people look forward to watching
horror movies that might contain violence or some kind of fantasy because many of us have the
need to let out our bad side out every now and then (in a safe way). Cohen states, “The monster
awakens one to the pleasures of the body, to the simple and fleeting joys of being frightened, or
frightening-to the experience of morality and corporality.” (Cohen 17). In my opinion, it is very
necessary to let our dark side out by watching horror movie, so we don’t end up Regina. She kept
her dark-self inside for too long, and once she was exposed to the dark side, she lost control of
maintaining her balance. “The mythic horror movie, like the sick joke, has a dirty job to do. It
deliberately appeals to all that is worst in us. It is morbidity unchained, our most base instincts
let free, our nastiest fantasies realized… and it all happens, fittingly enough, in the dark.” (King
2). Hence, watching horror movies or doing some thrilling activities, such as gun shooting
shows, is a healthy and harmless way to express the little evilness in us. And like King says, why
bother? Because it keeps them from getting out, man. It keeps them down there and me up here.
(King 2).
Introduction (The same idea in deferent Words)
What are monsters? Are they humans? Are they harmful? Do they die? The answer to these
questions is, it depends. Ever since we were born, we keep hearing stories about the good and the
evil, the hero and the villain, the friend and the enemy, and last but not least, the monster and the
human. There are so many different types of monsters that have different characteristics and
personalities. Though monsters are generally fictional, there is a great possibility that real
humans can turn out to be monsters too. In Monster Culture (Seven Theses), written by Jeffery
Jerome Cohen, there are seven theories about monsters that Cohen widely discusses and
analyzes. The purpose of his analysis is to read and understand cultures based on what monsters
they create and believe in. “I offer seven theses toward understanding cultures through the
monsters they bear.” (Cohen 4). Cohen’s seven theses are true and valid, and I absolutely agree
with most of them. I think that analyzing monsters is in fact an effective way of reading society,
especially is these monsters appeared in more than one time period.
Paragraph (1) (The same in deferent Words)
In Monster Culture (Seven Theses), Chen begins explaining his first theory on how the monster’s
body is a cultural body. He claims that the monster is born at this “crossroad” where all the
differences meet to symbolize something other than itself. “The monster’s body quite literally
incorporates fear, desire, anxiety, and fantasy, giving them life and uncanny independence.”
(Cohen 4). His second theses is that the monster always escapes. He argues that no matter how
many times you try to kill a monster, they can never be defeated. They may vanish, but only to
be born again somewhere else. He then goes on with his argument in the third theses where he
states that the monster always escapes because it refuses easy categorization. (Cohen 6). In other
words, it is very tough determine which category a monster is. It could be classified as a mix of
both animals and humans or none. The fourth theses that Cohen discussed is that the monster
dwells at the gate of difference, meaning the monster is an “outsider”. In addition, outsiders are
the ones that don’t belong depending on their culture, race, religion, sexuality…etc. such as the
racial discrimination in the twentieth century when people considered Ethiopians as sinners
because they have darker skin color. (Cohen 10). In the fifth theses, Cohen affirms that the
monster polices the borders of the possible, which means that monsters usually warn us from
exploring and knowing the unknown because curiosity will only lead to horrible endings for us
so we are better off not knowing. Next, Cohen confirms that fear of the monster is really a kind
of desire in his sixth theses. Since monsters are linked to forbidden practices, they become more
attractive to us because they can do what we cannot do, therefore; we watch some horror movies
to give us at least a temporary joy that satisfies our evil side. “The monster awakens one to the
pleasure of the body, to the simple and fleeting joys of being frightened, or frightened-to the
experience of morality and corporality.” (Cohen 17). As Cohen approaches the seventh theses, he
asks if monsters really exist, then he replies, “Surely they must, for if they did not, how could
we?” (Cohen 20). Finally, Cohen’s last theses is that the monster stands at the threshold… of
becoming. This theses indicates that when monsters come back, the make us reevaluate our
culture assumptions and bring out our society’s imperfections. “They ask us why we have
created them.” (Cohen 20).
Paragraph (2) about the first theses
The first monster that I chose to support Cohen’s argument in his first theses is outside source
Paragraph (3) about second theses
The second monster that I have chosen to support Cohen’s second theses The Monster Always
Escapes and (outside source)
Paragraph (4)
The third monster that I selected to prove Cohen’s sixth theory, Fear of the Monster Is Really a
Kind of Desire, (outside source)
Conclusion

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