Argumentative Essay

Please read direction attached very carefully and follow it as is to write about essay. Please just use the articles attached to write the essay.
engl_1301.183_final_exam_articles_drones.pdf

english_final_exam_direction.docx

Don't use plagiarized sources. Get Your Custom Essay on
Argumentative Essay
Just from $13/Page
Order Essay

engl_1301.183_final_exam_articles_drones.pdf

Unformatted Attachment Preview

ENGL 1301
1
ENGL 1301 Final Exam Article (Con)
“Delivery Drones Are a Bad Idea” By James Brumley
1
Drones in Amazon’s Future? In a development that was once something only
hypothesized in the cartoon/fantasy world of The Jetsons, Bezos says the company is developing
airborne Amazon drones to deliver many of the online retailer’s goods to its paying customers.
That’s right. Amazon feels it’s only a matter of time—and not even much of it—before cardtable-sized octocopters will be dropping off purchases right at your doorstep. Once the delivery
is made, the drone will fly back to its distribution center to pick up and deliver the next payload.
Amazon drones are a completely ridiculous and unworkable idea, of course, and will (no pun
intended) never get off the ground anytime in our lifetimes. Still, it’s fun to see someone of Jeff
Bezos’s ilk have as much faith as he has that science fiction is becoming scientific fact.
2
The response to the announcement has been what you might expect; half of the public
loves the premise, while the other half is proverbially rolling their eyes. What’s interesting is that
even the folks who love the idea don’t actually seem to think it’s going to be become a reality
anytime soon … despite Bezos’s optimism. Thing is, their intuition might be spot-on. Here are the
three biggest reasons Amazon drones are going to be grounded before ever taking flight.
3
1: The coverage areas for Amazon drones are inherently full of airborne hazards. It
wasn’t one of the underscored details of the 60 Minutes interview, but the proposed batteryoperated drone that Amazon is working on only has an operating range of about 10 miles from
its takeoff point; the service will only be available in fairly metropolitan areas near an Amazon
hub. It’s not really a customer service problem, as nobody expects the company to lose money
just to offer the delivery option in rural areas. Besides, rollouts of all sorts tend to begin in
metropolitan areas and work their way outward. No, the problem with populous areas—where
the service makes fiscal sense—is that these areas can be loaded with tall buildings, power lines,
cranes, birds and a million other things that could (literally) get in the way. And that’s partially
why …
4
2: Any in-flight failure will turn into a disaster. While it would be inaccurate to say inflight failures are common for these electric octocopters, it wouldn’t be inaccurate to say failures
do happen from time to time. And, unlike failures in airplanes where the plane at least has a shot
at being glided to safety, a failure on a couple (or more) of the delivery drones’ eight rotors
means a five-pound package—in addition to the weight of the drone itself—becomes a rock
falling out of the sky. What happens when—not if—it lands in the middle of a busy road, or
worse, lands on a moving car? It’s a remote possibility, but so are lighting strikes, and those kill
about 50 people per year. Of course, lightning has the benefit of being an uncontrollable product
of nature. Were there no alternative, it might be a case where the public simply had to suck it up
and deal with the risks. However, with a trio of safe, viable delivery-to-door services readily
available though, one Amazon drone-driven death is bound to be viewed as one too many.
5
3: When it’s all said and done, autonomous drones can’t do complex jobs, or adapt, as
well as people. Litmus test: Would you ever fly in an airplane that didn’t have a pilot on board,
but instead was flown wheels-up to wheels-down by a real-live person? Some people would say
“yes,” but most people know the value of a real pilot (or pilots) is in being there to solve
problems that aren’t programmed or put into an algorithm. Well, surprise! Amazon’s airborne
ferries are intended to be unmanned and unpiloted. That might be OK in the controlled setting of,
say, the parking lot of Amazon’s R&D [research and development] center. It would be a little
ENGL 1301
2
unnerving, however, to know that unmanned and unpiloted Amazon drones made regular passes
over the playground of your kids’ school. There’s a reason people still do exceedingly important
and potentially dangerous jobs— people remain better at them than computers.
6
Or, think about it like this. Delivery drones can’t ring a doorbell, retrieve a signature or
nestle a package behind a storm door on a rainy day. But Amazon’s deliveries are primarily
going to be metropolitan areas, mostly to apartment buildings and office buildings? That’s even
worse. How’s the service going to do any better than drop the parcel at the front door of what’s
apt to be a very big and well-trafficked building?
7
Amazon drones face a host of problems in addition to what’s been mentioned above. A
few other serious considerations include a litany of regulatory hurdles, as well as what happens
when people start trying to knock these drones down for their payloads. Amazon might have
gotten some flashy PR [publicity], and probably rankled the likes of FedEx and UPS [United
Parcel Service]. But you won’t have to start watching the skies for Amazon octocopters anytime
soon.
Full Text: COPYRIGHT 2016 Greenhaven Press, a part of Gale, Cengage Learning.
Source Citation:
Brumley, James. “Delivery Drones Are a Bad Idea.” The Impact of the Tech Giants, edited by
Jack Lasky, Greenhaven Press, 2016. Opposing Viewpoints. Opposing Viewpoints in
Context, spcezproxy.alamo.edu/login?url=http://link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/
EJ3010990221/OVIC?u=txs hracd2795&xid=3609ed89. Accessed 30 Apr. 2017.
Originally published as “Why Amazon Drones Absolutely Won’t Work. Not Even a Little
Bit,” Investorplace.com, 3 Dec. 2013.
Gale Document Number: GALE|EJ3010990221
ENGL 1301 Final Exam Article (Pro)
“Delivery Drones Are a Good Idea” by Christa Avampato
1
Amazon spent five years perfecting their food delivery system that’s akin to FreshDirect,
Peapod, and other similar services. This summer [2013] it expanded to Los Angeles from its
native Seattle. The window of possible delivery time is three hours long. Both of my local
grocery stores, Whole Foods [Market] and West Side Market, offer to deliver my purchases to
my home if I don’t feel like carrying them. Their delivery window is two hours, so I rarely utilize
it. Milk that’s two hours old isn’t an appetizing prospect, though Amazon puts those kinds of
items in temperature-controlled tote bags that it picks up with the next delivery. My local grocery
stores don’t offer that option. With efficient packing, faster turnaround, and more precise
scheduling, drones could take the place of the mammoth delivery trucks and make grocery
delivery the new norm.
ENGL 1301
3
2
In New York City, where I live, prepared food delivery is a way of life for many people.
GrubHub and Seamless are lifelines. When I spent the summer in LA, I learned that prepared
food delivery is a luxury and a rarity. With drones, the benefit of just-in-time prepared food
could become commonplace.
3
The U.S. Postal Service is an iconic symbol of our country, though every year it runs a
significant deficit. In 2012, it lost $15.9 billion—$11.1 billion of that went to prepayments on
future retiree benefits. This year, the loss amounted to $5 billion. While a significant
improvement in total over last year, it didn’t have the retiree benefit payments concerns of 2012,
and that means it’s a slightly higher loss from operations. Package and mail delivery in all forms
could be made cheaper and faster with drones in a time when the federal government could use
every extra dollar it can find to work on issues such as education, the environment, and health
care. By extension, services like UPS [United Parcel Service] and FedEx could also benefit from
drone package delivery.
4
As much as I love the items I order on Amazon, I rarely need them in 30 minutes.
Certainly I want them faster, though it’s not a matter of life or death that I get the new Malcolm
Gladwell book immediately. For items like medical and emergency supplies, we need technology
like drones. Some victims of Hurricane Sandy waited days for supplies. It took a week to get
desperately needed items to the Philippines after Typhoon Haiyan. Those affected by drought
and famine in the developing world can go months without food, proper drinking water, and
medical items.
5
Of course there are other complications beyond logistics such as politics, customs, and
security, though logistics certainly play a part in slowing down the process. Surely if we can
eventually get a book to someone in 30 minutes, we should be able to do something to improve
the distribution of humanitarian relief. Speaking of Hurricane Sandy, it took nearly a year for
some victims to have the damage to their property assessed. The holdup? There are just so many
FEMA [Federal Emergency Management Agency] claims adjustors to go around. Outfitted with
the right technology, drones could eventually supplement claims adjustment officers. We use
them to take pictures in outer space. Some schools of journalism use them now to explore areas
deeply affected by environmental events. Drones can take us to places we can’t go on our own,
and they can get us there much faster with less expense and without sacrificing our personal
safety.
6
This technology also presents an interesting entrepreneurial opportunity. Amazon has
the wherewithal to build its own drone delivery system. Many companies, perhaps even most,
don’t have the financial nor technological capability in-house to build this service. We could see
the rise of drone delivery companies and perhaps Amazon [could] white label its own drones for
use by others, as it has with Amazon Web Services. Interesting tidbit: With clients like Netflix
and the CIA [US Central Intelligence Agency], Amazon Web Services is primed to become the
largest profit driver of Amazon in the not-too-distant future. Not bad for a company that started
selling books online, delivered to the post office by Jeff Bezos himself.
7
Let’s face it. We’ve been in love with the idea of robots doing our bidding for decades.
Rosie the Robot of The Jetsons, KITT from Knight Rider, and the Roomba vacuum hold a
certain mystique and fascination. Make our meals, drive us around, and vacuum our homes. But
are we limiting ourselves by only seeing drones as machines that just take orders? Could we
eventually send them out of the house on our behalf à la Harry Potter’s owl, Hedwig? Can we
ENGL 1301
4
take them shopping with us as a personal attaché and assistant to carry our packages, give us
directions, deliver important reminders, and help us spot deals? Do they become companions in
our daily lives while also providing valuable services? Never underestimate a robot.
8
Jeff Bezos made more than an announcement about his company’s latest technological
development. He gave us a glimpse into the future that is not only possible but also probable.
Drones have the potential to lower cost [and] environmental impact, depending upon their power
sources, traffic congestion on the ground, and delivery time windows while increasing tracking
capabilities, precision scheduling, and our ability to get to places that are difficult for us to reach
in person. However, the complications and complexities are many. Bezos himself alluded to the
logistical, political, and security minefields that drone technology must cross before it can be
implemented and scaled. My next … piece will address these challenges in detail.
Full Text: COPYRIGHT 2016 Greenhaven Press, a part of Gale, Cengage Learning.
Source Citation:
Avampato, Christa. “Delivery Drones Are a Good Idea.” The Impact of the Tech Giants, edited
by Jack Lasky, Greenhaven Press, 2016. Opposing Viewpoints. Opposing Viewpoints in
Context, spcezproxy.alamo.edu/login?url=http://link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/
EJ3010990220/OVIC?u=txshracd2795&xid= b2d82a30. Accessed 30 Apr. 2017.
Originally published as “How Amazon Prime Air’s Drone Technology Could Affect
Other Businesses,” www.fool.com, 2 Dec. 2013.
Gale Document Number: GALE|EJ3010990220
TO PREPARE: READ the following articles provided by me.
Article 1: “Delivery Drones Are a Good Idea” (Pro) by Christa Avampato
Article 2: “Delivery Drones Are a Bad Idea” (Con) by James Brumley
NOTE: DO NOT USE ANY OTHER ARTICLES BESIDES THE TWO SHOWN
ABOVE.
PART I: Type of Essay
You will write an argumentative essay using MLA formatting in which you:
a. Take a position from one of the articles listed above (pro or con).
b. Develop three to five points related to your position, and state them in the thesis.
c. Support your position with evidence from the source(s) that have been provided to you, making sure to use
in-text citations.
d. Include a counterargument and refutation.
e. Summarize your argument in the conclusion.
f. Include a Works Cited page with the citation for the article(s) you used.
PART II: Format
1. Every essay MUST have an INTRODUCTION, a BODY (3-5 paragraphs), a COUNTERARGUMENT (1
paragraph), and a CONCLUSION.
2. Engage the reader in your INTRODUCTION
*The THESIS statement must be the LAST SENTENCE in the introduction.
3. Each paragraph MUST have a MINIMUM of FIVE SENTENCES. a. The first sentence MUST be a
TOPIC sentence that tells the reader what the paragraph will cover and should include a TRANSITION.
b. Include at least ONE (1) QUOTATION from the article in each body paragraph.
i. Begin the quotation with an introductory or signal phrase.
ii. Use quotation marks at the beginning and end of a quote. Quotes should be no more than four typed lines.
iii. Include a proper in-text citation for the quote to include the author’s last name (if not in the signal phrase)
and the paragraph number Ex.: (Smith, par. 6).
c. After the quote, include YOUR EXPLANATION of how or why the quote fits your point in the topic
sentence.
d. The last sentence MUST be a CLINCHER sentence that summarizes the paragraph and begins to transition
to the next point.
4. The CONCLUSION must RESTATE the THESIS, SUMMARIZE POINTS, and leave FOOD FOR
THOUGHT.
Writing Prompt:
After reading the articles “Delivery Drones Are a Good Idea” and “Delivery Drones Are a Bad Idea,” select
one (1) side of the topic, and write an argumentative essay of about 800-1000 words in which you discuss
the advantages or disadvantages of using delivery drones for business.
• What is your position on the topic?
• What are your reasons for your position?
• Explain your position, and support it with examples from the article(s), any real life examples, and
reasoning.
• What counterargument could you make?
• Explain why your position is better than the counterargument.
• Use quotes from the article with in-text citations where appropriate to support your position or refute the
opposing position.
• Include a Works Cited page.
ENGL 1301
1
ENGL 1301 Final Exam Article (Con)
“Delivery Drones Are a Bad Idea” By James Brumley
1
Drones in Amazon’s Future? In a development that was once something only
hypothesized in the cartoon/fantasy world of The Jetsons, Bezos says the company is developing
airborne Amazon drones to deliver many of the online retailer’s goods to its paying customers.
That’s right. Amazon feels it’s only a matter of time—and not even much of it—before cardtable-sized octocopters will be dropping off purchases right at your doorstep. Once the delivery
is made, the drone will fly back to its distribution center to pick up and deliver the next payload.
Amazon drones are a completely ridiculous and unworkable idea, of course, and will (no pun
intended) never get off the ground anytime in our lifetimes. Still, it’s fun to see someone of Jeff
Bezos’s ilk have as much faith as he has that science fiction is becoming scientific fact.
2
The response to the announcement has been what you might expect; half of the public
loves the premise, while the other half is proverbially rolling their eyes. What’s interesting is that
even the folks who love the idea don’t actually seem to think it’s going to be become a reality
anytime soon … despite Bezos’s optimism. Thing is, their intuition might be spot-on. Here are the
three biggest reasons Amazon drones are going to be grounded before ever taking flight.
3
1: The coverage areas for Amazon drones are inherently full of airborne hazards. It
wasn’t one of the underscored details of the 60 Minutes interview, but the proposed batteryoperated drone that Amazon is working on only has an operating range of about 10 miles from
its takeoff point; the service will only be available in fairly metropolitan areas near an Amazon
hub. It’s not really a customer service problem, as nobody expects the company to lose money
just to offer the delivery option in rural areas. Besides, rollouts of all sorts tend to begin in
metropolitan areas and work their way outward. No, the problem with populous areas—where
the service makes fiscal sense—is that these areas can be loaded with tall buildings, power lines,
cranes, birds and a million other things that could (literally) get in the way. And that’s partially
why …
4
2: Any in-flight failure will turn into a disaster. While it would be inaccurate to say inflight failures are common for these electric octocopters, it wouldn’t be inaccurate to say failures
do happen from time to time. And, unlike failures in airplanes where the plane at least has a shot
at being glided to safety, a failure on a couple (or more) of the delivery drones’ eight rotors
means a five-pound package—in addition to the weight of the drone itself—becomes a rock
falling out of the sky. What happens when—not if—it lands in the middle of a busy road, or
worse, lands on a moving car? It’s a remote possibility, but so are lighting strikes, and those kill
about 50 people per year. Of course, lightning has the benefit of being an uncontrollable product
of nature. Were there no alternative, it might be a case where the public simply had to suck it up
and deal with the risks. However, with a trio of safe, viable delivery-to-door services readily
available though, one Amazon drone-driven death is bound to be viewed as one too many.
5
3: When it’s all said and done, autonomous drones can’t do complex jobs, or adapt, as
well as people. Litmus test: Would you ever fly in an airplane that didn’t have a pilot on board,
but instead was flown wheels-up to wheels-down by a real-live person? Some people would say
“yes,” but most people know the value of a real pilot (or pilots) is in being there to solve
problems that aren’t programmed or put into an algorithm. Well, surprise! Amazon’s airborne
ferries are intended to be unmanned and unpiloted. That might be OK in the controlled setting of,
say, the parking lot of Amazon’s R&D [research and development] center. It would be a little
ENGL 1301
2
unnerving, however, to know that unmanned and unpiloted Amazon drones made regular passes
over the playground of your kids’ school. There’s a reason people still do exceedingly important
and potentially dangerous jobs— people remain better at them than computers.
6
Or, think about it like this. Delivery drones can’t ring a doorbell, retrieve a signature or
nestle a package behind a storm door on a rainy day. But Amazon’s deliveries are primarily
going to be metropolitan areas, mostly to apartment buildings and office buildings? That’s even
worse. How’s the service going to do any better than drop the parcel at the front door of what’s
apt to be a very big and well-trafficked building?
7
Amazon drones face a host of problems in addition to what’s been mentioned above. A
few other serious considerations include a litany of regulatory hurdles, as well as what happens
when people start trying to knock these drones down for their payloads. Amazon might have
gotten some flashy PR [publicity], and probably rankled the likes of FedEx and UPS [United
Parcel Service]. But you won’t have to star …
Purchase answer to see full
attachment

GradeAcers
Calculate your paper price
Pages (550 words)
Approximate price: -

Why Work with Us

Top Quality and Well-Researched Papers

We always make sure that writers follow all your instructions precisely. You can choose your academic level: high school, college/university or professional, and we will assign a writer who has a respective degree.

Professional and Experienced Academic Writers

We have a team of professional writers with experience in academic and business writing. Many are native speakers and able to perform any task for which you need help.

Free Unlimited Revisions

If you think we missed something, send your order for a free revision. You have 10 days to submit the order for review after you have received the final document. You can do this yourself after logging into your personal account or by contacting our support.

Prompt Delivery and 100% Money-Back-Guarantee

All papers are always delivered on time. In case we need more time to master your paper, we may contact you regarding the deadline extension. In case you cannot provide us with more time, a 100% refund is guaranteed.

Original & Confidential

We use several writing tools checks to ensure that all documents you receive are free from plagiarism. Our editors carefully review all quotations in the text. We also promise maximum confidentiality in all of our services.

24/7 Customer Support

Our support agents are available 24 hours a day 7 days a week and committed to providing you with the best customer experience. Get in touch whenever you need any assistance.

Try it now!

Calculate the price of your order

Total price:
$0.00

How it works?

Follow these simple steps to get your paper done

Place your order

Fill in the order form and provide all details of your assignment.

Proceed with the payment

Choose the payment system that suits you most.

Receive the final file

Once your paper is ready, we will email it to you.

Our Services

No need to work on your paper at night. Sleep tight, we will cover your back. We offer all kinds of writing services.

Essays

Essay Writing Service

No matter what kind of academic paper you need and how urgent you need it, you are welcome to choose your academic level and the type of your paper at an affordable price. We take care of all your paper needs and give a 24/7 customer care support system.

Admissions

Admission Essays & Business Writing Help

An admission essay is an essay or other written statement by a candidate, often a potential student enrolling in a college, university, or graduate school. You can be rest assurred that through our service we will write the best admission essay for you.

Reviews

Editing Support

Our academic writers and editors make the necessary changes to your paper so that it is polished. We also format your document by correctly quoting the sources and creating reference lists in the formats APA, Harvard, MLA, Chicago / Turabian.

Reviews

Revision Support

If you think your paper could be improved, you can request a review. In this case, your paper will be checked by the writer or assigned to an editor. You can use this option as many times as you see fit. This is free because we want you to be completely satisfied with the service offered.

Order your essay today and save 15% with the discount code DISCOUNT15