Assessment Task 1: Designing teaching and learning activities for K-2 based on children’s books

The Task: Focus on Reading and ViewingCreate a package of resources for use with K-2 students that develops emergent or early Reading and Viewing skills with Rationale.This package has 7 sections and includes:1. Selecting a book:‘Twinkle” by Nick Bland CHOSEN TEXT for kindergartens NESA- Suggested texts for the K-10 English Syllabus:Assessment Task 1: Designing teaching and learning activities for K-2 based on children’s booksIdentify a year level to focus on and select a high-quality children’s picture book for use in a K-2 classroom. Justify the book choice with reference to its linguistic features and the opportunities it offers for developing code breaking and meaning making. Design teaching and learning activities to develop K-2 students’ literacy skills with considerations for struggling readers and EAL/D students. Provide the full APA reference of the book in the Reference list.2. Justifying the book choice: (Approx. 400 words)To justify your selection, you will need to explain the suitability of your picture book’s theme,language and visual features for the selected year level. Briefly comment on theopportunities it offers for developing code breaking and meaning making appropriate for theyear level of the students. Draw on at least 2 references from the unit reading list to supportyour justification of your book choice. It is assumed your understanding of current literacytheories and the children’s literacy development with reference to the Australian Curriculum:English (Level Description) and the NESA syllabus Learning Outcomes will be evident.3. Book Orientation: (Approx. 200 words)Write a series of focused statements and questions indicating how you could introduce thebook to students.4. Teaching and learning activities: (Equivalent to 600 words)Using dot points, provide a brief description of THREE year and stage appropriate activities toaccompany your selected text, each addressing one of the following, to teach Listening/Speaking, Reading and Viewing skills.(1) Phonological awareness(2) Vocabulary(3) Visual LiteracySpecify the relevant NESA syllabus learning outcome and one indicator (not counted towardsthe 600 words) that the activity addresses. At least one activity includes the use oftechnology.(Note: Extra teaching and learning resources can be provided in the Appendix).5. Teaching and assessing comprehension: (Approx. 300 words)Drawing on relevant roles of the reader, design three questions you could use to develop andmonitor students’ comprehension of the picture book. Provide a brief explanation of how youcould help students work out each of the answers from reading the text.(Note: You must provide a copy of the sections of the text you use to design the questions inthe Appendix)ONLY DO UP TO HEREADD REFERENCEThese will help -http://sunshinecollective.com.au/2016/09/20/twinkle-nick-bland/-https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9XJw2e7Z30gIve also attached an outline that will help you!this has the rubric! Please reference! also please read through attached outline
edla241_assessent_1.pdf

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ASSESSMENT SUMMARY
Assessment Task 1: Designing teaching
and learning activities for K-2 based on
children’s books
Identify a year level to focus on and
select a high-quality children’s picture
book for use in a K-2 classroom. Justify
the book choice with reference to its
linguistic features and the opportunities
it offers for developing code breaking
and meaning making. Design teaching
and learning activities to develop K-2
students’ literacy skills with
considerations for struggling readers and
EAL/D students.
Weigh Learni Graduat
ting
ng
e
Outco Attribut
me/s
es
Assess
ed
50%
1,2,3,
4,5
GA5,
GA4,
GA8,
GA9,
GA10
Australian
Graduate
Teacher
Standards
ACECQA
1.2, 1.3,
A2,A6
2.1, 2.3,
2.5, 2.6
B4, B9
C5,
3.3. 3.4
5.1, 5.3,
5.4
Assessment Task 1: Designing teaching and learning activities for K-2 based on children’s
books
The Task: Focus on Reading and Viewing
Create a package of resources for use with K-2 students that develops emergent or early
Reading and Viewing skills with Rationale.
This package has 7 sections and includes:
1. Selecting a book:
Identify a year level to focus on and select a high-quality children’s picture book for use in
the classroom. The picture book can be selected from the following lists. Ensure your
selected text is published between 2010 – 2018.
NSW Premiere Reading Challenge booklists:
The most recent award-winning booklists suggested by The Children’s Book
Council of Australia:
https://cbca.org.au/winners-2017
• NSW Premiere Reading Challenge booklists:
https://online.det.nsw.edu.au/prc/booklist/listBooksByTitle.html?
letter=A&levelId=1
• NESA- Suggested texts for the K-10 English Syllabus:
•
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https://syllabus.bostes.nsw.edu.au/assets/global/files/english-k10suggested-texts.pdf
Note:
•
Please do not use ‘The very cranky bear’ by Nick Bland as this text is going to be
used in tutorials for practice.
•
You may use the same book as other students but you are not allowed to use
each other’s activities.
•
Provide the full APA reference of the book in the Reference list.
2. Justifying the book choice: (Approx. 400 words)
To justify your selection, you will need to explain the suitability of your picture book’s theme,
language and visual features for the selected year level. Briefly comment on the
opportunities it offers for developing code breaking and meaning making appropriate for the
year level of the students. Draw on at least 2 references from the unit reading list to support
your justification of your book choice. It is assumed your understanding of current literacy
theories and the children’s literacy development with reference to the Australian Curriculum:
English (Level Description) and the NESA syllabus Learning Outcomes will be evident.
3. Book Orientation: (Approx. 200 words)
Write a series of focused statements and questions indicating how you could introduce the
book to students.
4. Teaching and learning activities: (Equivalent to 600 words)
Using dot points, provide a brief description of THREE year and stage appropriate activities to
accompany your selected text, each addressing one of the following, to teach Listening/
Speaking, Reading and Viewing skills.
(1) Phonological awareness
(2) Vocabulary
(3) Visual Literacy
Specify the relevant NESA syllabus learning outcome and one indicator (not counted towards
the 600 words) that the activity addresses. At least one activity includes the use of
technology.
(Note: Extra teaching and learning resources can be provided in the Appendix).
5. Teaching and assessing comprehension: (Approx. 300 words)
Drawing on relevant roles of the reader, design three questions you could use to develop and
monitor students’ comprehension of the picture book. Provide a brief explanation of how you
could help students work out each of the answers from reading the text.
(Note: You must provide a copy of the sections of the text you use to design the questions in
the Appendix)
6. Supporting struggling readers: (Approx. 500 words)
Suggest 2 strategies to support struggling readers including EAL/D students: one at school
(teacher focused strategy) and one at home or in the community (parent focused strategy).
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Drawing on the unit references, provide justification for the choice of strategies in the light
of current literacy theories, including the role of oral language in learning to read.
7. A reference list using the current APA referencing style (not included in the word count).
Due date:
Week 8 Tuesday 24th April, 2018 by 11:59 pm
Weighting:
50%
Length and/or format:
2000 words
Purpose:
This task will enable students to Identify a year level to
focus on and select a high-quality children’s picture book for
use in a K-2 classroom. Students will demonstrate
understanding of the suitability of a picture book’s theme,
language and visual features to a particular year level. They
will also demonstrate their ability to select relevant learning
outcomes and design creative and effective teaching and
learning activities to develop K-2 students’ literacy skills,
with considerations for struggling readers and EAL/D
students. The purpose of this task will enable students to
draw on reflections and critical analysis of research,
theories, issues and topics covered in the unit and to engage
in critical and reflective thinking about current issues in
literacy education after practical application.
Learning outcomes assessed:
1,3,4,5
How to submit:
Submit as a word document including your names and
student numbers in the footer, together with the link to your
digital learning resource and password if applicable.
Return of assignment:
Assessment Tasks will be submitted, marked and returned
electronically via LEO as appropriate within 3 weeks after the submission date.
Assessment criteria:
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See rubric in Appendix 1
Version: ExtendedUnitOutline_2018
Referencing
This unit requires you to use the APA referencing system.
See the ‘Academic referencing’ page from the Office of Student Success for more details.
ACU Policies and regulations
It is your responsibility to read and familiarise yourself with ACU policies and regulations,
including regulations on examinations, review and appeals, acceptable use of IT facilities,
and conduct and responsibilities. A list of these and other important policies can be found at
the University Policies page of the Student Portal.
Assessment Policy and Procedures
You must read the Assessment Policy and Assessment Procedures in the University Handbook:
they include rules on deadlines; penalties for late submission; extensions; and special
consideration. If you have any queries on Assessment Policy, please see your Lecturer in
Charge.
Academic integrity
You have the responsibility to submit only work which is your own, or which properly
acknowledges the thoughts, ideas, findings and/or work of others. The Framework for
Academic Integrity and the Academic Honesty Policy are available from the website. Please
read them, and note in particular that plagiarism, collusion and recycling of assignments are
not acceptable. Penalties for academic dishonesty can vary in severity, and can include being
excluded from the course.
Turnitin
The ‘Turnitin’ application (a text-matching tool) will be used in this unit, in order to enable:
students to improve their academic writing by identifying possible areas of poor
citation and referencing in their written work; and
teaching staff to identify areas of possible plagiarism in students’ written work.
While Turnitin can help in identifying problems with plagiarism, avoiding plagiarism is more
important. Information on avoiding plagiarism is available from the Academic Skills Unit.
For any assignment that has been created to allow submission through Turnitin (check the
Assignment submission details for each assessment task), you should submit your draft well in
advance of the due date (ideally, several days before) to ensure that you have time to work
on any issues identified by Turnitin. On the assignment due date, lecturers will have access to
your final submission and the Turnitin Originality Report.
STUDENT SUPPORT
If you are experiencing difficulties with learning, life issues or pastoral/spiritual concerns, or
have a disability/medical condition which may impact on your studies, you are advised to
notify your Lecturer in Charge, Course Coordinator and/or one of the services listed below as
soon as possible. For all aspects of support please contact the Office of Student Success.
Academic Skills offers a variety of services, including workshops (on topics such as
assignment writing, time management, reading strategies, referencing), drop-in sessions,
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group appointments and individual consultations. It has a 24-hour online booking system for
individual or group consultations.
Campus Ministry offers pastoral care, spiritual leadership and opportunities for you to be
involved with community projects.
Career Development Service can assist you with finding employment, preparing a resume
and employment application and preparing for interviews.
Counselling Service is a free, voluntary, confidential and non-judgmental service open to
all students and staffed by qualified social workers or registered psychologists.
Disability Services can assist you if you need educational adjustments because of a
disability or chronic medical condition; please contact them as early as possible.
Indigenous Units on each campus provide information and support for students.
The Unit Outline Resources web page (http://students.acu.edu.au/241467) provides links for
each service.
ONLINE RESOURCES AND TECHNOLOGY REQUIREMENTS
The LEO page for this unit contains further readings/ discussion forums.
http://leo.acu.edu.au/course/view.php?id=17803
TEXTS AND REFERENCES:
Required texts
1. Hill, S. (2012). Developing early literacy: assessment and teaching (2nd Ed). Victoria:
Australia. Eleanor Curtin Publishing. (Available for purchase in Co-Op bookshop)
2. Fellowes, J., & Oakley, G. (2014). Language, literacy and early childhood education.
Melbourne, Victoria: Oxford University Press. (2nd ed)
This resource is available for online access from ACU library through this link:
https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/acu/detail.action?docID=4191368
3. Christie, F. (2005). Language education in the primary years: UNSW Press. Chapters 1, 2,
4&9
This resource is available for online access from ACU library through this link:
https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/acu/detail.action?docID=291996
Recommended references
•
•
•
•
Adam, H & Harper, L. (2016). Educating for values and diversity through culturally
inclusive children’s literature. PETAA Paper 205.
Barton, G. (2016). Unpacking visual literacy for early years learners. Practically Primary
21(1): 6-9.
Blamey, K. & Beauchat K. (2011). Word Walk: Vocabulary instruction for young children.
The Reading Teacher. Vol 65(1), pp.71-75.
Callow, J. (2013). The shape of text to come. Newtown, NSW: PETAA.
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•
Fisher, D. & Frey, N. (2010). Identifying instructional moves during guided learning: expert
teachers use a four-part process to scaffold student understanding during small groupgroup guided instruction. The Reading Teacher 64(2) p.84.
•
Freebody, P. (2013). Knowledge about language, literacy and literature in the teaching and
learning of English. In A. Simpson, S. White, P. Freebody, & B. Comber (Eds.), Language,
literacy and literature (pp. 3-25). South Melbourne, Vic: Oxford University Press.
•
Hertzberg, M., & Freeman, J. (2012). Teaching English language learners in mainstream
classes. Primary English Teaching Association Australia. (Chapter 5, pp.76-107)
•
Lowe, K. (2017). Parents’ guide to helping children with reading at home. PETAA.
www.petaa.edu.au
•
Massey, L. (2013). From the reading rug to the play centre: Enhancing vocabulary and
comprehensive language skills by connecting storybook reading and guided play. Early
Childhood Education 41:125-13.
•
McLaughlin, M. (2012), Reading Comprehension: What Every Teacher Needs to Know. The
Reading Teacher, 65(7).
•
Spear-Swerling, L. (2016). Common types of reading problems and how to help children
who have them. The Reading Teacher 69(5), pp. 513-522.
Topfer, C. (2014). Setting up for spelling success-ten tips for thoughtful
learning. Practically Primary, 19(3), 16.
•
•
Seely Flint, A., Kitson, L., Lowe, K., & Shaw, K. (2013 or 2014). Literacy in Australia:
Pedagogies for engagement. Milton, Qld: John Wiley & Sons Australia Ltd. (Chapter 5).
•
Unsworth, L. (2001). Teaching multiliteracies across the curriculum. Buckingham: Open
University Press (Chapter 6, pp.183-219),
•
Vlach, S. & Burcie, J. (2010). Narratives of the struggling reader. The Reading Teacher,
63(6), pp.522-525.
Further references
• Beauchat, K. A., & Blamey, K. L. (2012). Effective read-alouds for early literacy: A
teacher’s guide for PreK-1 (pp.7-16). New York: Guilford Press.
• Burke, A., & Marsh, J. (2013). Children’s virtual play worlds: Culture, learning and
participation. New York, NY: Peter Lang.
•
Center, Y. (2005). Beginning reading: A balanced approach to reading instruction in the
first three years at school. Sydney: Allen & Unwin.
•
Clay, M. (2007). An observation survey of early literacy achievement. Auckland, NZ:
Heinemann.
•
Emmitt, M., Zbaracki, M., Komesaroff, L., & Pollock, J. (2014). Language and learning: An
introduction for teaching (6th ed.). Melbourne, Vic: Oxford University Press.
•
Gibbons, P. (2009). Challenging expectations: Literacy, intellectual quality and English
language learners in the middle years. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
•
Holliday, M. (2008). Strategies for reading success. Newtown, NSW: Primary English
Teaching Association (e:lit).
•
Holliday,M. (2010). Strategies for writing success. Newtown, NSW: Primary English
Teaching Association (e:lit).
•
Pinnell, G.S., & Fountas, I.C. (2007). The continuum of literacy learning grades K-8:
Behaviors and understandings to notice, teach and support. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
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•
Westwood, P. (2008). What teachers need to know about spelling. Camberwell, Vic.: ACER
Press.
•
Winch, G., Johnston, R., March, P, Ljungdahl, L., & Holliday, M. (2015). Literacy: Reading,
writing and children’s literature (5th ed.). Melbourne: Oxford.
Extended readings
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Anstey, M., & Bull, G. (2006). Teaching and learning multiliteracies: Changing times,
changing literacies. Kensington Gardens, SA: Australian Literacy Educators Association.
Beaty, J. J. (2009). 50 early childhood literacy strategies. Upper Saddle River, NJ:
Pearson.
Boushey, G., & Moser, J. (2006). The daily five: fostering literacy independence in the
elementary grades. Portland, Me.:Stenhouse.
Clay, M. (1993). Reading recovery: A guidebook for teachers in training. Auckland, NZ:
Heinemann.
Coiro, J. (Ed.). (2008). Handbook of research on new literacies. New York: Lawrence
Erlbaum Associates.
Comber, B., & Kamler, B. (2005). Turn-around pedagogies. Literacy interventions for at
risk students. Newtown: PETA.
Emmitt, M., Hornsby, D., & Wilson. L. (2006). The place of phonics in learning to read and
write. Norwood, SA: Australian Literacy Educators’ Association.
Diller, D. (2008). Spotlight on small groups. Portland, Me.: Stenhouse.
Ewing, R. (Ed.). (2006). Beyond the reading wars. Newtown, NSW: Primary English
Teaching Association.
Fleer, M., & Williams-Kennedy, D. (2002). Building Bridges: Literacy development in young
indigenous children. Watson, ACT: AECA.
Freebody, P. (2007). Literacy Education in School: Research perspectives from the past,
for the future. Camberwell, Victoria: Australian Council for Educational Research.
Healy, A. (Ed.). (2008). Multiliteracies and diversity education: New pedagogies for
expanding landscapes. South Melbourne, Vic.: Oxford University Press.
Kalantzis, M., Cope, B., Chan, E., & Dalley-Trim, L. (2016). Literacies. Cambridge
University Press.
Louden, W., Rohl, M., Barratt-Pugh, C., Brown, C., Cairney, T., Elderfield, J., House, H.,
Meiers, M., Rivalland, J.,and Rowe, K. (2005). In Teachers’ Hands: Effective Literacy
Teaching Practices in the Early Years of Schooling. Australian Journal of Language and
Literacy, 28(3),181-252.
Simpson, A. (2008). Reading under the covers:Helping children to choose books.
Newtown, NSW: Primary English Teaching Association.
Swan, C. (2009). Teaching strategies for literacy in the early years. Norwood, SA:
Australian Literacy Educators Association.
Wild, R. (2009). Where do I start? Stimulating ideas for literacy-rich primary classrooms.
Newtown, NSW: Primary English Teaching Association.
Available as electronic resources through ACU library:
• Coltheart, M., & Prior, M. (2007). Learning to read in Australia. Canberra: Academy of the
Social Sciences in Australia.
• Gambrell, L., Morrow, L., & Pressley, M. (Eds.) (2007). Best practices in literacy
instruction. N.Y.: Guildford Press.
• Glynn, T., Wearmouth, J., & Berryman, M. (2006). Support students with literacy
difficulties: A responsive approach. Maidenhead, England: Open University Press.
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•
•
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•
•
•
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Lankshear, C., & Knobel, M. (2006). New literacies: Everyday practices and classroom
learning. Maidenhead, England: Open University Press.
Muschla, G. R. (2006). Teach terrific writing. New York, N.Y.: McGraw-Hill.
Paratore, J., & McCormack, R. (Eds.). (2007). Classroom literacy assessment: Making
sense of what students know and do. New York, N.Y.: Guildford Press.
Schumm, J. S. (Ed.) (2006). Reading assessment and instruction for all learners. New
York, N.Y.: Guilford Press.
Tracey, D. H. (2006). Lenses on Reading: An introduction to theories and models. London:
Guilford Press.
Westwood, P. (2008). What teachers need to know about reading and writing.
Camberwell, Vic.: ACER Press.
W., Rohl, M., Barratt-Pugh, C., Brown, C., Cairney, T., Elderfield, J., House, H., Meiers,
M., Rivalland, J.,and Rowe, K. (2005). In Teachers’ Hands: Effective Literacy Teaching
Practices in the Early Years of Schooling. Australian Journal of Language and Literacy,
28(3),181-252.
Journals
A variety of journals, many available as ejournals, are relevant to this unit and will provide
important material for you to use in your responses to the assessment tasks. Some of those
are listed below but there are many more. Consulting a Librarian will prove valuable.
The Australian Educational Researcher
The Australian Journal of Language and Literacy
Practically Primary
Teachers and Teaching: Theory and Practice
The Reading Teacher
Early Childhood Education
English in Australia
Websites
All of the following links (active February 2017)
Australian Curriculum and Assessment Reporting Authority http://www.acara.edu.au/
NSW Board of Studies. NSW English K-6 Syllabus http://www.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au
Australian Literacy Educators’ Association www.alea.edu.au
Primary English Teaching Association Australia https://www.petaa.edu.au/
Commonwealth Department of Education, Science and Training www.myread.org
Developing Early Literacy http://developing-early-literacy.com.au/
Reading Australia http://readingaustralia.com.au/
Write it Right English: Educational Semiotics
Write It Right English
Professional Facebook pages
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Clever Classroom
B.E. a grammar ACE
Teaching Ideas
Reading Australia
Create-abilities
Selected children’s literature texts you may have used when you studied EDLA104

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