java coding program

This assignment can be completed either individual or by a group of 2 students, ensure to submit a zip file of all the .java files to canvas and name the zip file by your first and last name (example: Joe_Stuart.zip) and if you are a group of 2 make sure the zip file has both the students first and last name (example: Sally_Jones-Joe_Stuart.zip) (My first name Jin, last name Zheng.)(I NEED COMPLETE JAVA CODING PROGRAM NOT JUST Paragraph) Please flowing step by stepWrite a Java interface called Lockable that includes the following methods: setKey, lock, unlock, and locked. • The setKey, lock and unlock methods take an integer parameter that represents the key. • The setKey method establishes the key. • The lock and unlock methods lock and unlock the object, but only if the key passed in is correct. • The locked method returns a boolean that indicates whether or not the object is locked. A Lockable object represents an object whose regular methods are protected: if the object is locked, the methods cannot be invoked; if it is unlocked, they can be invoked. Write a version of the Coin class (call it Coin2) from Chapter 5 so that it is Lockable.//******************///Coin.java//flips a two sided coin//*******************public class CoinFlip{//—————————————————————–// Creates a Coin object, flips it, and prints the results.//—————————————————————–public static void main(String[] args){Coin myCoin = new Coin();myCoin.flip();System.out.println(myCoin);if (myCoin.isHeads())System.out.println(“You win.”);elseSystem.out.println(“Better luck next time.”);}}//********************************************************************// Coin.java Author: Lewis/Loftus//// Represents a coin with two sides that can be flipped.//********************************************************************public class Coin{private final int HEADS = 0;private final int TAILS = 1;private int face;//—————————————————————–// Sets up the coin by flipping it initially.//—————————————————————–public Coin(){flip();}//—————————————————————–// Flips the coin by randomly choosing a face value.//—————————————————————–public void flip(){face = (int) (Math.random() * 2);}//—————————————————————–// Returns true if the current face of the coin is heads.//—————————————————————–public boolean isHeads(){return (face == HEADS);}//—————————————————————–// Returns the current face of the coin as a string.//—————————————————————–public String toString(){String faceName;if (face == HEADS)faceName = “Heads”;elsefaceName = “Tails”;return faceName;}}**Then Use the following driver CoinFlipTest to test your Coin2 class and Lockable interface.public class CoinFlipTest {//———— // Flips a coin multiple times and counts the number of heads // and tails that result. Locks and unlocks coins //———————————————————- public static void main(String[] args) { Coin2 myCoin = new Coin2(); myCoin.setKey(1111); System.out.println(“Initial: ” + myCoin); myCoin.lock(1111); System.out.println(“After lock: ” + myCoin); myCoin.flip(); System.out.println(“After attempted flip: ” + myCoin); myCoin.unlock(1111); myCoin.flip(); System.out.println(“After unlock: ” + myCoin); }Output should look like the following: (Heads and Tails maybe different)Initial: TailsAfter lock: LOCKEDAfter attempted flip: LOCKEDAfter unlock: Tails
chap05__1_.pptx

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Chapter 5
Conditionals and Loops
Java Software Solutions
Foundations of Program Design
9th Edition
John Lewis
William Loftus
Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc.
Conditionals and Loops
• Now we will examine programming statements
that allow us to:
– make decisions
– repeat processing steps in a loop
• Chapter 5 focuses on:
–
–
–
–
–
–
–
boolean expressions
the if and if-else statements
comparing data
while loops
iterators
the ArrayList class
more GUI controls
Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc.
Outline
Boolean Expressions
The if Statement
Comparing Data
The while Statement
Iterators
The ArrayList Class
Determining Event Sources
Managing Fonts
Check Boxes and Radio Buttons
Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc.
Flow of Control
• Unless specified otherwise, the order of statement
execution through a method is linear: one after
another
• Some programming statements allow us to make
decisions and perform repetitions
• These decisions are based on boolean expressions
(also called conditions) that evaluate to true or false
• The order of statement execution is called the flow
of control
Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc.
Conditional Statements
• A conditional statement lets us choose which
statement will be executed next
• They are sometimes called selection statements
• Conditional statements give us the power to make
basic decisions
• The Java conditional statements are the:
– if and if-else statement
– switch statement
• We’ll explore the switch statement in Chapter 6
Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc.
Boolean Expressions
• A condition often uses one of Java’s equality
operators or relational operators, which all return
boolean results:
==
!=
< >
<= >=
equal to
not equal to
less than
greater than
less than or equal to
greater than or equal to
• Note the difference between the equality operator
(==) and the assignment operator (=)
Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc.
Boolean Expressions
• An if statement with its boolean condition:
if (sum > MAX)
delta = sum – MAX;
• First, the condition is evaluated: the value of sum is
either greater than the value of MAX, or it is not
• If the condition is true, the assignment statement is
executed; if it isn’t, it is skipped
• See Age.java
Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc.
//********************************************************************
// Age.java
Author: Lewis/Loftus
//
// Demonstrates the use of an if statement.
//********************************************************************
import java.util.Scanner;
public class Age
{
//—————————————————————-// Reads the user’s age and prints comments accordingly.
//—————————————————————-public static void main(String[] args)
{
final int MINOR = 21;
Scanner scan = new Scanner(System.in);
System.out.print(“Enter your age: “);
int age = scan.nextInt();
continue
Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc.
continue
System.out.println(“You entered: ” + age);
if (age < MINOR) System.out.println("Youth is a wonderful thing. Enjoy."); System.out.println("Age is a state of mind."); } } Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc. Sample Run continue Enter your age: 47 You entered: 47 Age is a state of mind. System.out.println("You entered: " + age); if (age < MINOR) System.out.println("Youth is a wonderful thing. Enjoy."); System.out.println("Age is a state of mind."); } } Another Sample Run Enter your age: 12 You entered: 12 Youth is a wonderful thing. Enjoy. Age is a state of mind. Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc. Logical Operators • Boolean expressions can also use the following logical operators: ! && || Logical NOT Logical AND Logical OR • They all take boolean operands and produce boolean results • Logical NOT is a unary operator (it operates on one operand) • Logical AND and logical OR are binary operators (each operates on two operands) Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc. Logical NOT • The logical NOT operation is also called logical negation or logical complement • If some boolean condition a is true, then !a is false; if a is false, then !a is true • Logical expressions can be shown using a truth table: a !a true false false true Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc. Logical AND and Logical OR • The logical AND expression a && b is true if both a and b are true, and false otherwise • The logical OR expression a || b is true if a or b or both are true, and false otherwise Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc. Logical AND and Logical OR • A truth table shows all possible true-false combinations of the terms • Since && and || each have two operands, there are four possible combinations of a and b a b a && b a || b true true false true false true true false false true true true false false false false Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc. Logical Operators • Expressions that use logical operators can form complex conditions if (total < MAX+5 && !found) System.out.println("Processing…"); • All logical operators have lower precedence than the relational operators • The ! operator has higher precedence than && and || Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc. Boolean Expressions • Specific expressions can be evaluated using truth tables total < MAX found !found total < MAX && !found false false true false false true true true false true false true false false true false Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc. Short-Circuited Operators • The processing of && and || is “short-circuited” • If the left operand is sufficient to determine the result, the right operand is not evaluated if (count != 0 && total/count > MAX)
System.out.println(“Testing.”);
• This type of processing should be used carefully
Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc.
Outline
Boolean Expressions
The if Statement
Comparing Data
The while Statement
Iterators
The ArrayList Class
Determining Event Sources
Managing Fonts
Check Boxes and Radio Buttons
Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc.
The if Statement
• Let’s now look at the if statement in more detail
• The if statement has the following syntax:
if is a Java
reserved word
The condition must be a
boolean expression. It must
evaluate to either true or false.
if ( condition )
statement;
If the condition is true, the statement is executed.
If it is false, the statement is skipped.
Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc.
Logic of an if statement
condition
evaluated
true
false
statement
Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc.
Indentation
• The statement controlled by the if statement is
indented to indicate that relationship
• The use of a consistent indentation style makes a
program easier to read and understand
• The compiler ignores indentation, which can lead to
errors if the indentation is not correct
“Always code as if the person who ends up
maintaining your code will be a violent
psychopath who knows where you live.”
— Martin Golding
Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc.
Quick Check
What do the following statements do?
if (total != stock + warehouse)
inventoryError = true;
if (found || !done)
System.out.println(“Ok”);
Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc.
Quick Check
What do the following statements do?
if (total != stock + warehouse)
inventoryError = true;
Sets the boolean variable to true if the value of total
is not equal to the sum of stock and warehouse
if (found || !done)
System.out.println(“Ok”);
Prints “Ok” if found is true or done is false
Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc.
The if-else Statement
• An else clause can be added to an if statement to
make an if-else statement
if ( condition )
statement1;
else
statement2;
• If the condition is true, statement1 is executed; if
the condition is false, statement2 is executed
• One or the other will be executed, but not both
• See Wages.java
Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc.
//********************************************************************
// Wages.java
Author: Lewis/Loftus
//
// Demonstrates the use of an if-else statement.
//********************************************************************
import java.text.NumberFormat;
import java.util.Scanner;
public class Wages
{
//—————————————————————-// Reads the number of hours worked and calculates wages.
//—————————————————————-public static void main(String[] args)
{
final double RATE = 8.25; // regular pay rate
final int STANDARD = 40;
// standard hours in a work week
Scanner scan = new Scanner(System.in);
double pay = 0.0;
continue
Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc.
continue
System.out.print(“Enter the number of hours worked: “);
int hours = scan.nextInt();
System.out.println();
// Pay overtime at “time and a half”
if (hours > STANDARD)
pay = STANDARD * RATE + (hours-STANDARD) * (RATE * 1.5);
else
pay = hours * RATE;
NumberFormat fmt = NumberFormat.getCurrencyInstance();
System.out.println(“Gross earnings: ” + fmt.format(pay));
}
}
Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc.
continue
Sample Run
System.out.print(“Enter
the number
of hours
worked:
Enter the number
of hours
worked:
46 “);
int hours = scan.nextInt();
Gross earnings: $404.25
System.out.println();
// Pay overtime at “time and a half”
if (hours > STANDARD)
pay = STANDARD * RATE + (hours-STANDARD) * (RATE * 1.5);
else
pay = hours * RATE;
NumberFormat fmt = NumberFormat.getCurrencyInstance();
System.out.println(“Gross earnings: ” + fmt.format(pay));
}
}
Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc.
Logic of an if-else statement
condition
evaluated
true
false
statement1
statement2
Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc.
The Coin Class
• Let’s look at an example that uses a class that
represents a coin that can be flipped
• Instance data is used to indicate which face (heads
or tails) is currently showing
• See CoinFlip.java
• See Coin.java
Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc.
//********************************************************************
// CoinFlip.java
Author: Lewis/Loftus
//
// Demonstrates the use of an if-else statement.
//********************************************************************
public class CoinFlip
{
//—————————————————————-// Creates a Coin object, flips it, and prints the results.
//—————————————————————-public static void main(String[] args)
{
Coin myCoin = new Coin();
myCoin.flip();
System.out.println(myCoin);
if (myCoin.isHeads())
System.out.println(“You win.”);
else
System.out.println(“Better luck next time.”);
}
}
Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc.
Sample Run
//********************************************************************
// CoinFlip.java
Author: Lewis/Loftus
Tails
//
// Demonstrates the use
of anluck
if-else
Better
nextstatement.
time.
//********************************************************************
public class CoinFlip
{
//—————————————————————-// Creates a Coin object, flips it, and prints the results.
//—————————————————————-public static void main(String[] args)
{
Coin myCoin = new Coin();
myCoin.flip();
System.out.println(myCoin);
if (myCoin.isHeads())
System.out.println(“You win.”);
else
System.out.println(“Better luck next time.”);
}
}
Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc.
//********************************************************************
// Coin.java
Author: Lewis/Loftus
//
// Represents a coin with two sides that can be flipped.
//********************************************************************
public class Coin
{
private final int HEADS = 0;
private final int TAILS = 1;
private int face;
//—————————————————————-// Sets up the coin by flipping it initially.
//—————————————————————-public Coin()
{
flip();
}
continue
Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc.
continue
//—————————————————————-// Flips the coin by randomly choosing a face value.
//—————————————————————-public void flip()
{
face = (int) (Math.random() * 2);
}
//—————————————————————-// Returns true if the current face of the coin is heads.
//—————————————————————-public boolean isHeads()
{
return (face == HEADS);
}
continue
Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc.
continue
//—————————————————————-// Returns the current face of the coin as a string.
//—————————————————————-public String toString()
{
String faceName;
if (face == HEADS)
faceName = “Heads”;
else
faceName = “Tails”;
return faceName;
}
}
Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc.
Indentation Revisited
• Remember that indentation is for the human
reader, and is ignored by the compiler
if (depth >= UPPER_LIMIT)
delta = 100;
else
System.out.println(“Reseting Delta”);
delta = 0;
• Despite what the indentation implies, delta will be
set to 0 no matter what
Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc.
Block Statements
• Several statements can be grouped together into a
block statement delimited by braces
• A block statement can be used wherever a
statement is called for in the Java syntax rules
if (total > MAX)
{
System.out.println(“Error!!”);
errorCount++;
}
Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc.
Block Statements
• The if clause, or the else clause, or both, could
govern block statements
if (total > MAX)
{
System.out.println(“Error!!”);
errorCount++;
}
else
{
System.out.println(“Total: ” + total);
current = total*2;
}
• See Guessing.java
Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc.
//********************************************************************
// Guessing.java
Author: Lewis/Loftus
//
// Demonstrates the use of a block statement in an if-else.
//********************************************************************
import java.util.*;
public class Guessing
{
//—————————————————————-// Plays a simple guessing game with the user.
//—————————————————————-public static void main(String[] args)
{
final int MAX = 10;
int answer, guess;
Scanner scan = new Scanner(System.in);
Random generator = new Random();
answer = generator.nextInt(MAX) + 1;
continue
Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc.
continue
System.out.print(“I’m thinking of a number between 1 and ”
+ MAX + “. Guess what it is: “);
guess = scan.nextInt();
if (guess == answer)
System.out.println(“You got it! Good guessing!”);
else
{
System.out.println(“That is not correct, sorry.”);
System.out.println(“The number was ” + answer);
}
}
}
Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc.
continue
Sample
Run
System.out.print(“I’m
thinking of
a number
betweenwhat
1 andit” is: 6
I’m thinking
of a number between
1 and
10. Guess
+ MAX + “. Guess what it is: “);
That is not correct, sorry.
The number was 9
guess = scan.nextInt();
if (guess == answer)
System.out.println(“You got it! Good guessing!”);
else
{
System.out.println(“That is not correct, sorry.”);
System.out.println(“The number was ” + answer);
}
}
}
Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc.
Nested if Statements
• The statement executed as a result of an if or
else clause could be another if statement
• These are called nested if statements
• An else clause is matched to the last unmatched
if (no matter what the indentation implies)
• Braces can be used to specify the if statement to
which an else clause belongs
• See MinOfThree.java
Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc.
//********************************************************************
// MinOfThree.java
Author: Lewis/Loftus
//
// Demonstrates the use of nested if statements.
//********************************************************************
import java.util.Scanner;
public class MinOfThree
{
//—————————————————————-// Reads three integers from the user and determines the smallest
// value.
//—————————————————————-public static void main(String[] args)
{
int num1, num2, num3, min = 0;
Scanner scan = new Scanner(System.in);
System.out.println(“Enter three integers: “);
num1 = scan.nextInt();
num2 = scan.nextInt();
num3 = scan.nextInt();
continue
Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc.
continue
if (num1 < num2) if (num1 < num3) min = num1; else min = num3; else if (num2 < num3) min = num2; else min = num3; System.out.println("Minimum value: " + min); } } Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc. continue if (num1 < num2) if (num1 < num3) min = num1; else min = num3; else if (num2 < num3) min = num2; else min = num3; Sample Run Enter three integers: 84 69 90 Minimum value: 69 System.out.println("Minimum value: " + min); } } Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc. Outline Boolean Expressions The if Statement Comparing Data The while Statement Iterators The ArrayList Class Determining Event Sources Managing Fonts Check Boxes and Radio Buttons Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc. Comparing Data • When comparing data using boolean expressions, it's important to understand the nuances of certain data types • Let's examine some key situations: – – – – Comparing floating point values for equality Comparing characters Comparing strings (alphabetical order) Comparing object vs. comparing object references Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc. Comparing Float Values • You should rarely use the equality operator (==) when comparing two floating point values (float or double) • Two floating point values are equal only if their underlying binary representations match exactly • Computations often result in slight differences that may be irrelevant • In many situations, you might consider two floating point numbers to be "close enough" even if they aren't exactly equal Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc. Comparing Float Values • To determine the equality of two floats, use the following technique: if (Math.abs(f1 - f2) < TOLERANCE) System.out.println("Essentially equal"); • If the difference between the two floating point values is less than the tolerance, they are considered to be equal • The tolerance could be set to any appropriate level, such as 0.000001 Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc. Comparing Characters • As we've discussed, Java character data is based on the Unicode character set • Unicode establishes a particular numeric value for each character, and therefore an ordering • We can use relational operators on character data based on this ordering • For example, the character '+' is less than the character 'J' because it comes before it in the Unicode character set • Appendix C provides an overview of Unicode Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc. Comparing Characters • In Unicode, the digit characters (0-9) are contiguous and in order • Likewise, the uppercase letters (A-Z) and lowercase letters (a-z) are contiguous and in order Characters 0–9 A–Z a–z Unicode Values 48 through 57 65 through 90 97 through 122 Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc. Comparing Strings • Remember that in Java a character string is an object • The equals method can be called with strings to determine if two strings contain exactly the same characters in the same order • The equals method returns a boolean result if (name1.equals(name2)) System.out.println("Same name"); Copyright © 2017 Pearson Education, Inc. Comparing Strings • We cannot use the relational oper ... Purchase answer to see full attachment

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