Bullying Prevention: Creating a Supportive Classroom Climate

Based on the readings, videos, online resources and the PPT in this module, respond to the following prompts on creating a supportive classroom climate. Your paper must be 4 pages using APA 6th edition formatting, title page, in-text citation, references and 12 point font. Discuss why it is important to foster a supportive and inclusive classroom environment. What are best practices in building a safe and positive classroom climate? What steps must you take as the teacher to model acceptance in the classroom? Discuss how your teaching strategies will reflect inclusiveness.List three classroom rules you will use to model acceptance and inclusiveness. Notes from ModuleMini Lecture: Gender Sexuality and Gender EquityGender SexualityThis cartoon provokes serious thoughts about the issues of gender and sexuality. In this module, we will dive deeper into these dynamics as they have a great impact for students and their teachers.These dynamics have serious ramifications for students’ achievement because of issues such as self-esteem, other behaviors and bullying. Over the last few years we have read of young people taking their lives because of bullying. Sadly, this kind of event occurs more often than is reported nationally.You will read more and view video clips that highlight the serious and growing problem of bullying because of sexual lifestyles choices.As potential secondary school educators, it is our responsibility to ensure gender equity in the classroom and to make sure we do everything we can to help maintain students’ self-esteem and safety.The Dignity for All Students ActThe Dignity for All Students Act (DASA) added Article 2 to the Education Law (Education Law §§10 through 18), to require, among other things, school districts to create policies and guidelines to be used in school training programs to discourage the development of discrimination or harassment and to enable employees to prevent and respond to discrimination or harassment. These provisions took effect on July 1, 2012.Gender EquityThe topics of gender equity in K-12 settings and institutions everywhere have become incredibly important.The following excerpt is from the Linda Darling-Hammond and John Bransford (2005) Preparing Teachers for a changing world: What teachers should learn and be able to do.Research also suggest that males and females tend to have different experiences in school, and these experiences can affect their potential for achievement and success. Females are less likely to be called upon by name, are asked fewer complex and abstract questions, receive less praise or constructive feedback, and are given less direction on how to do things for themselves. although girls are identified for gifted programs more often than boys in elementary school, by high school fewer girls remain in gifted programs; this is particularly true for African American and Hispanic females.On the other hand, boys receive more teacher attention than females, including more negative attention, and may be discipline more harshly than girls for violating the same rules, and males, especially African American males, are disproportionately placed in special education, often inappropriate.If we are to create schools where all students have opportunities to learn, teachers must know how to be alert for these kinds of disparities and aware of how to provide classroom environments that are both physically and psychologically safe for all students. p. 242.Additional resources for your teacher toolkitTeaching Tolerance- Paul Gorski Imagining Equity Literacy GLSEN Videos on youtubehttps://www.youtube.com/glsenGLSEN Educator Guideshttps://www.glsen.org/educate/resources/guidesOiweus Bullying Prevention Program
http://www.violencepreventionworks.org/public/index.pageDifferentiated Instruction: An OverviewOrlich, D.C., Harder, R.J., Callahan, R.C., Trevisan, M. S., Brown, A. H., & Miller, D. E. (2013). Teaching strategies: A guide to effective instruction, (10th ed). Belmont,CA: Wadsworth Cengage Learning, p .57-58.Differentiation of InstructionDifferentiation of instruction is very similar to UDL in that the purpose of differentiation is to provide access to learning for a wide range of student learners. Differentiation of instruction involves providing multiple options for the teacher and students in the instruction and content of lessons, as well as in the process and the products of the lesson ( Tomlinson, 2001; Tomlinson & McTighe, 2006). Like UDL, differentiation of instruction is not a lesson plan or a recipe, but more of a design approach one takes in developing lessons.All students learn at different rates and demonstrate a wide array of preferences for how learning occursâ??alone, in small groups, on the computer, and so on. As teachers differentiate their instruction, they focus on students’ interests, achievement levels, preferences, and motivation, and craft their instruction as well as options for student products with these varying characteristics in mind. With differentiation, the teacher offers choices to students in how they engage with the content to be learned, as well as how they demonstrate their learning. Choice provides students with a sense of empowerment over their own learning and achievement.Differentiation is an approach to lesson planning.Assessment for DifferentiationConduct frequent assessments so that you know your students’ instructional and independent levels of learning. Students learn most efficiently if they understand or have mastered 90 percent or more of content/skills. If instructional activities are at the correct level, students can focus on the 10 percent of the content/skill they do not understand or haven’t mastered. The independent level of learning is considered to be mastery of 95 percent or more of a concept/skill. Homework, which is usually geared toward the independent level, should be adjusted for difficulty and challenge so that all students can successfully complete out-of-class assignments. Your students won’t be at the same instructional or independent levels of learning, so you will need to provide materials and resources that reflect multiple levels of challenge.
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Teen Suicide in the Gay, Lesbian,
Bisexual, Transgender &
Questioning Youth Population
Patricia Isaac, Ph.D.
Associate Professor
SUNY Empire State College
A Thoughtful Moment
â?ª
Welcome everyone
â?ª
The purpose of this presentation is to better inform school
psychologist, school counselors, school nurses and educators
â?ª
I hope to share this information in a way that is thoughtful
and conveys healing and balance
â?ª
This presentation is dedicated to all people who have been
touched by a suicide
â?ª
Self-care
2
Patricia Isaac, Ph.D. SUNY Empire
5/28/2015
Center for Disease Control- 2015
For youth between the ages of 10 and 24, suicide is the third leading
cause of death. It results in approximately 4600 lives lost each year
(CDC, March 2015).
According to data from Youth Risk Behavior Surveys (YRBS)
conducted during 2001â??2009 in seven states and six large urban
school districts, the percentage of LGB students (across the sites)
who were threatened or injured with a weapon on school property
in the prior year ranged from 12% to 28%. In addition, across the
sitesâ??(CDC, 2015)
19% to 29% of gay and lesbian students and 18% to 28% of bisexual
students experienced dating violence in the prior year.
14% to 31% of gay and lesbian students and 17% to 32% of bisexual
students had been forced to have sexual intercourse at some point
in their lives.2
http://www.cdc.gov/lgbthealth/youth.htm
ï??




3
Patricia Isaac, Ph.D. SUNY Empire
5/28/2015
CDC & LGBTQ Youth Suicide -2015
LGBTQ youth are also at increased risk for suicidal
thoughts and behaviors, suicide attempts, and suicide. A
nationally representative study of adolescents in grades
7â??12 found that lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth were
more than twice as likely to have attempted suicide as
their heterosexual peers.3 More studies are needed to
better understand the risks for suicide among
transgender youth. However, one study with 55
transgender youth found that about 25% reported suicide
attempts.4
http://www.cdc.gov/lgbthealth/youth.htm


4
Patricia Isaac, Ph.D. SUNY Empire
5/28/2015
Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Trasngender &
Questioning Youth
â?ª
â?ª
â?ª
5
There is no definitive, objective estimate of the size of
the sexual minority population (Overby & Barth, 2006).
Studies suggest that among youth 9.6- 10.3% reported
having a same gender sexual experience (Hobson,
Glazier & Scheer, 2007).
Dâ??Augelli, (2002) conducted a study of 542 GLB youth
for mental health problems results revealed a third
reported attempting suicide.
50% greater likelihood that GLBT youth seriously
considers suicide (Hobson et al., 2007).
Patricia Isaac, Ph.D. SUNY Empire
5/28/2015
Center for Disease Control 2013 Youth Risk
Behavior Surveillance – US
Carried a Weapon to School Property
5.2%
Threatened or Injured with a Weapon on School Property
6.9
In a Physical Fight on School Property
8.1
Bullied on School Property
19.6
Electronically Bullied
14.8
Did Not Go to School Because of Safety Concerns
7.1
Carried a weapon
17.9
Physical Dating Violence/ Forced Sexual Intercourse
7.8 /7.3
Felt Sad or Hopeless/Seriously Considered Attempting
Suicide
29.9/
17.0
Made a Suicide Plan/ Attempted Suicide
13.6/8.0
ï??
N = 13,583 Grades 9-12
ï??
http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/pdf/ss/ss6304.pdf
6
Patricia Isaac, Ph.D. SUNY Empire
5/28/2015
Risk Factors for GLBTQ Youth
Hobson et al., 2007 , Suicide risk factors
ï?? Conflicts with family and/ or peers
ï?? Harassment, abuse or rejection
ï?? Driven out of home
ï?? Homelessness (street life, prostitution
and unprotected sex)
ï?? School based anti-gay attitudes
ï?? Institutionalized heterosexism and
homophobia
ï?? Social isolation
ï?? Ineffective coping and family dysfunction
ï?? Loss of a support system- school, family
and church
ï?? Host of mental health issues depression, substance abuse, feelings of
hopelessness and helplessness
ï?? Negative media attention ad
stereotyping (Hobson et al, 2007)
7







CDC (2015) Risk factors:
History of previous suicide
attempts
Family history of suicide
History of depression or other
mental illness
Alcohol or drug abuse
Stressful life event or loss
Easy access to lethal methods

Exposure to the suicidal behavior
of others

Incarceration
Patricia Isaac, Ph.D. SUNY Empire
5/28/2015
Protective Factors for GLBTQ
Social support
Close friendships
School connectedness and safe schools
Family connection
Teacher and adult caring
Gay Straight Alliance in schools
Community based support groups







8
Patricia Isaac, Ph.D. SUNY Empire
5/28/2015
Prevention for GLBTQ Youth at
Risk
School Health Index- http://www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth/SHI/
ï?? Local mental health agencies and outreach
ï?? School crisis plan to include proactive mental health screening
ï?? Safe schools policy
ï?? 19 states protect students from bullying and harassment based
of sexual orientation (GLSEN, 2015)
ï?? NYS Dignity for All Students Act- DASA
ï?? NYSED Guidance on Bullying and Cyberbullying Preventionhttp://www.p12.nysed.gov/technology/internet_safety/docume
nts/cyberbullying.html
ï?? NYS Olweus Bullying Prevention Initiative
http://www.gvboces.org/NYS_SSS.cfm?subpage=212540
ï??
9
Patricia Isaac, Ph.D. SUNY Empire
5/28/2015
Warning Signs of Suicidal Behavior
â?ª
â?ª
â?ª
â?ª
â?ª
â?ª
10
Verbal or written statements about death
Dramatic change in behavior or personality
Fascination with death and dying
Giving away prized possessions or making a will
Interpersonal conflicts or loss
Triggers- getting into trouble with authorities, breakup,
death of a loved one, knowing someone who committed
suicide, bullying or victimization, family conflict, school
failure, disappointment or rejection, trauma, serious illness
or injury, anniversary of a death of a loved one & forced
or extended separation from friends or family (Kalafat &
Lazarus, 2002)
Patricia Isaac, Ph.D. SUNY Empire
5/28/2015
First Contact
ï??
ï??
ï??
ï??
ï??
11
As school psychologists, educators, counselors and
individuals in the human health profession you are the first
line of help for many of these young adults
Often minority and GLBTQ youth do not have access to
mental health services or young people may choose not to
get help
If you have reason to believe, either by direct knowledge,
or report from another person that a person or student is
in danger of harming him / herself, you must report the
situation to the site administrators.
Know your school crisis plan
Know who are the appropriate contacts to inform (school
counselors, nurse or safe school designated person)
Patricia Isaac, Ph.D. SUNY Empire
5/28/2015
NYS Suicide Prevention and Intervention Programs &
National Training Programs
ï??
Know your local school crisis plan
ï??
Become familiar with community based services and agencies in your school community that
offer youth and family counseling
ï??
American Psychological Association Lesbian, Gay & Bisexual Student Project
http://www.apa.org/pi/lgbt/programs/hlgbsp/index.aspx
ï??
NASP – http://www.nasponline.org/index.aspx
ï??
American Association of Suicidology implemented a school suicide prevention accreditation
program http://www.suicidology.org/web/guest/home
ï??
NYS Office of Youth and Family Services http://www.ocfs.state.ny.us/main/youth/
ï??
NYS Runaway & Homeless Youth Program
http://www.ocfs.state.ny.us/main/youth/rhydirectory.asp
ï??
Empire State Coalition for Youth and Family Services
http://www.monroecountysystemofcare.org/files/PDFs/Connecting%2520the%2520Pieces.pdf
ï??
NYSOMH will offer online training for educators in suicide prevention- Suicide Prevention
Initiatives -518.408.2013 http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/new-york-state-office-ofmental-health-launches-state-wide-youth-suicide-prevention-program-with-kognitos-at-risksimulation-127726353.html
12
Patricia Isaac, Ph.D. SUNY Empire
5/28/2015
Parting Thoughts

A survey was conducted in Okinawa, Japan because it has
the highest percentage of residents one hundred years
old or older. Most of those surveyed were described as
cheerful, lively, enthusiastic, straightforward, and having a
large circle of friends.
 Stand strong, there is always someone by your side
FACES Program at the Southside Community CenterSyracuse
13
Patricia Isaac, Ph.D. SUNY Empire
5/28/2015
Thank You
14
Patricia Isaac, Ph.D. SUNY Empire
5/28/2015
References
ï??
ï??
ï??
ï??


Center for Disease Control and Prevention. (2014).Youth Risk Behavior
Surveillance â?? United States 2013 retrieved November 1, 2014 from
http://search.cdc.gov/search?query=youth????&utf8=%E2%9C%93&affil
iate=cdc-main
Crepeau-Hobson, F., Glazier, R., Scheer, A. (2007). Suicidality among sexual
minority youth. NASP Communiqué, 36(1).
Debski, J., Spadafore, C. D., Jacob, S., Poole, D. A., & Hixson, M. D. (2007). Suicide
intervention:Training, roles, and knowledge of school psychologists. Psychology in
the Schools, 44, 157â??170.
Dâ??Augelli, A. R., (2002). Mental health problems among lesbian, gay, and bisexual
youths ages 14 to 21. Clinical and Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 7(3):433-456.
Gay Lesbian Straight Education Network (2013). 2013 National School Climate
Survey. Retrieved November 1, 2014 from
http://www.glsen.org/sites/default/files/2013%20National%20School%20Climate%20
Survey%20Full%20Report_0.pdf
Joe, S., Baser, R. S., Neighbors, H. W., Caldwell, C.H., & Jackson, J.S. (2009). 12month and lifetime prevalence of suicide attempts among black adolescents in
the National Survey of American Life. Journal of American Academy of Child &
Adolescent Psychiatry, 48(3), 237-239.
15
Patricia Isaac, Ph.D. SUNY Empire
5/28/2015
References

Lezine, D.A. (2008). Eight stories up: An adolescent chooses hope over suicide. New York: Oxford
University Press.

Lieberman, R., Polland, S., & Cowan, K. (2006, October). Suicide prevention and intervention:
With appropriate attention and thoughtful planning, the risk of student suicide can be
minimized. National Association of School Psychologists. Retrieved September 10, 2007, from
http://www.naspcenter.org/principals.

Miller, D. N. (2010, January). A centennial milestone (1910â??2010): 100 years of youth suicide
prevention. NASP Communiqué, 38(5)

Miller, D. N., & Jome, L. M. (2008). School psychologists and the assessment of childhood
internalizing disorders: Perceived knowledge, role preferences, and training needs. School
Psychology International, 29, 500â??510.

Oâ??Donnell, L., Oâ??Donnell, C., Wardlaw, D.M., & Stueve, A.(2004). Risk and resiliency factors
influencing suicidality among urban African-American and Latino youth. American Journal of
Community Psychology, 33(1/2):38-49.
16
Patricia Isaac, Ph.D. SUNY Empire
5/28/2015
2015 STATE SNAPSHOT
SCHOOL CLIMATE IN
NEW YORK
Findings from the GLSEN 2015 National School Climate Survey demonstrate that New York schools were not safe for most
lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) secondary school students. In addition, many LGBTQ students in New
York did not have access to important school resources, such as having an inclusive curriculum, and were not protected by
comprehensive anti-bullying/harassment school policies.
FACT: The majority of LGBTQ students in New York regularly heard anti-LGBT remarks (Fig. 1). Many also regularly heard school
staff make homophobic remarks (19%) and negative remarks about someoneâ??s gender expression (30%).
FACT: Most LGBTQ students in New York had been victimized at school (Fig. 2). Of those, most never reported the incident to
Figurestudents
1. Hearing
Anti-LGBT
from
Figure
2. Identity-based Harassment & Assa
school staff (51%). Only 33% of those
who
reportedRemarks
incidents
said it resulted in effective staff
intervention.
Students in New York Schools
in New York Schools
(percentage
of
LGBTQ
students
hearing
remarks
(percentage
of
LGBTQ
students harassed or assa
Figure 1. Hearing Anti-LGBT Remarks from
Figure 2. Identity-based Harassment & Assault
sometimes, often, or frequently)
Students in New York Schools
in New York Schools
6
Sexual
(percentage of 100%
LGBTQ students hearing remarks
(percentage of LGBTQ
students harassed or assaulted)
21%
Orientation
85%
sometimes, often, or87%
frequently)
9%
100%
80%
60%
40%
20%
0%
77%
80%
87%
60%
77%
40%
Sexual
Orientation
63%
85%
63%
20%
Gender
Expression
Gender
0%
65%
21%
Gender
9% Expression
8%
8%
50%
16%
Gender
20%
42%
16%
6%
42%
Verbal Haras
19%
5%
Physical Har
3%
Verbal Harassment
21%
Physical Ass
6%
Physical
Harassment
4%
Physical Assault
0%
20%
40%
60%
16%
Race or
6%
Ethnicity
19%
5%
Disability
3%
21%
6%
4%
â??Gayâ? Used in Homophobic
Negative
Negative
Race
or
a Negative
Remarks
Remarks
Remarks
Ethnicity
Way (e.g.,
â??fagâ? about Gender
about
â??Gayâ? Used in Homophobic
Negative (e.g., Negative
so
â??dykeâ?)
Transgender
a Negative
Remarks â??thatâ??s
Remarks
Remarks Expression Disability
People
Way (e.g.,
(e.g., â??fagâ? gayâ?)
about Gender
about
â??thatâ??s so
â??dykeâ?)
Expression
Transgender
0%
gay�)
People
50%
16%
40%
60%
80%
FACT: Many LGBTQ students in New York reported discriminatory policies or practices at their school (Fig. 3). Nearly half (49%)
experienced at least one form of discrimination at school during the past year.
â?¢ About 1 in 5 LGBTQ students in New York were disciplined for
Figure 3. Discrimination Against LGBTQ Students
in New York Schools
public affection that does not result in similar action when it
(percentage
that were prevented from…)
occurs between non-LGBTQ students (21%).
Figure 3. Discrimination Against
LGBTQ Students
in New York Schools
â?¢ In New York, 1 in 5 LGBTQ students (21%), and over 3 in 5
Expressing
PDA from…)
in School
(percentage that were
prevented
transgender students (66%), were unable to use the school
restroom that aligned with their gender. Additionally, nearly 1
Using the Bathroom or Locker
Expressing PDA in School
21%
in 5 of LGBTQ students (17%), and nearly half of transgender
Room that Aligns with Gender
students (46%), were prevented from using their Using
preferred
the Bathroom or Locker
Wearing Clothes Considered
name and gender pronouns in school.
21%
Room that Aligns with Gender
21%
21%
17%
Inappropriate for Their Gender
â?¢ LGBTQ students experienced other forms of school
Wearing Clothes Considered
Using Their Preferred Name
discrimination (not in Fig. 3): being unable to wear
LGBT- for Their Gender
Inappropriate
or Gender Pronoun 17%
supportive apparel (9%), being unable to discuss LGBT issues
Using Their Preferred Name
in assignments (11%), being unable to include LGBT
themes in
Bringing a Same-gender
17%Date
or Gender Pronoun
to a School Dance
extracurricular activities (e.g. school yearbook, Day of Silence)
(11%), and being prevented or discouraged from Bringing
playing aschool
Same-gender Date
11% a GSA
Forming or Promoting
sports due to an LGBT identity (8%).
to a School Dance
Forming or Promoting a GSA
10%
11%
8%
0%
8%
0%
GLSEN
110 William Street, 30th Floor, New York, NY 10038
17%
20%
10%
20%
30%
30%
(212) 727-0135 . glsen.org
facebook.com/glsen . twitter: @glsen
Figure 4. Availability of LGBT-Related Resources &
Forming or Promoting a GSA
8%
0%
10%
20%
30%
FACT: Many LGBTQ students in New York did not have access to in-school resources and supports (Fig. 4).
â?¢ Only 1 in 5 (22%) attended a school with a
comprehensive anti-bullying/harassment policy
that included specific protections based on sexual
orientation and gender identity/expression).
â?¢ Nearly all could identify at least one school staff
member supportive of LGBT students, but only 3 in 4
(77%) could identify 6 or more supportive school staff.
â?¢ Only 1 in 3 (31%) were taught positive things about
LGBT people in class.
â?¢ Less than 2 in 3 could access information about LGBT
communities on school Internet.
Figure 4. Availability of LGBT-Related Resources &
Supports in New York Schools
22%
Comprehensive Policy
At Least One
Supportive Educator
98%
6 or More Supportive
Educators
77%
Gay-Straight Alliance
68%
31%
Inclusive Curriculum
Library Resources
49%
Internet Access
RECOMMENDATIONS
60%
0%
20%
40%
60%
80%
100%
School-based supports such as comprehensive anti-bullying/harassment policies, school personnel who are supportive of
LGBTQ students, Gay-Straight Alliances, and LGBT-inclusive curricular resources can positively affect school climate for LGBTQ
students. Findings from the 2015 National School Climate Survey demonstrate that students attending schools with these
resources and supports report more positive school experiences, including lower victimization and absenteeism and higher
academic achievement.
Given the high percentages of LGBTQ students in New York who experience harassment at school and the limited access to key
resources and supports that can have a positive effect on their school experiences, it is critical that New York school leaders,
education policymakers, and other individuals who are obligated to provide safe learning environments for all students take the
following steps:
â?¢ Implement comprehensive school anti-bullying/harassment policies;
â?¢ Support Gay-Straight Alliances;
â?¢ Provide professional development for school staff on LGBTQ student issues; and
â?¢ Increase student access to LGBT-inclusive curricular resources.
These actions can move us toward a future in which all students in New York will have the opportunity to learn and succeed in
school, regardless of sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression.
To learn more about GLSEN and to get involved, visit glsen.org or contact glsen@glsen.org.
To get involved in the Capital Region chapter, visit glsen.org/chapters/nycr or contact nycr@chapters.glsen.org.
To get involved in the Husdon Valley chapter, contact glsen.org/chapters/hudsonvalley.
To get involved in the New York City chapter, contact newyorkcity@chapters.glsen.org.
ABOUT THE RESEARCH In 2015, GLSEN conducted the ninth National School Climate Survey (NSCS), a biennial survey of the experiences
of LGBTQ youth in U.S. secondary schools. The national sample consisted of 10,528 LGBTQ students from all 50 states and the District of
Columbia. A total of 579 respondents were attending schools in New York. The New York sample was majority White/European American (69%),
15% Hispanic/Latino, 4% Black/African American, 7% Multiracial, and 3% Asian/South Asian/Pacific Islander. The gender composition was
27% cisgender male, 37% cisgender female, 14% transgender, 11% genderqueer, and 12% another gender (e.g., genderfluid). Most (86%)
attended public schools. The school community makeup was 29% rural/small town, 43% suburban, and 28% urban. The results reported for
New York have a margin of error of 4%.
For the full 2015 National School Climate Survey report or for any other GLSEN research, go to glsen.org/research.
Follow @GLSENResearch on Twitter.
Suggested citation: GLSEN. (2017). School Climate in New York (State Snapshot). New York: GLSEN.
GLSEN is the leading national education organization focused on ensuring safe schools
for all students.
© GLSEN 2017
GLSEN
110 William Street, 30th Floor, New York, NY 10038
(212) 727-0135 . glsen.org
facebook.com/glsen . twitter: @glsen
From Teasing to Torment:
School Climate Revisited
A Survey of U.S. Secondary School Students and Teachers
A Report from GLSEN | www.glsen.org
From Teasing to Torment:
School Climate Revisited
A Survey of U.S. Secondary School Students and Teachers
by
Emily A. Greytak, PhD
Joseph G. Kosciw, PhD
Christian Villenas, PhD
Noreen M. Giga, MPH
A Report from GLSEN | www.glsen.org
with support from
National Headquarters
110 William St.
New York, NY 10038
Ph: 212-727-0135 Fax: 212-727-0254
DC Policy Office
1001 Connecticut Ave NW, Suite 206
Washington, DC 20036
Ph: 202-347-7780 Fax: 202-347-7781
info@glsen.or …
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Our Services

No need to work on your paper at night. Sleep tight, we will cover your back. We offer all kinds of writing services.

Essays

Essay Writing Service

No matter what kind of academic paper you need and how urgent you need it, you are welcome to choose your academic level and the type of your paper at an affordable price. We take care of all your paper needs and give a 24/7 customer care support system.

Admissions

Admission Essays & Business Writing Help

An admission essay is an essay or other written statement by a candidate, often a potential student enrolling in a college, university, or graduate school. You can be rest assurred that through our service we will write the best admission essay for you.

Reviews

Editing Support

Our academic writers and editors make the necessary changes to your paper so that it is polished. We also format your document by correctly quoting the sources and creating reference lists in the formats APA, Harvard, MLA, Chicago / Turabian.

Reviews

Revision Support

If you think your paper could be improved, you can request a review. In this case, your paper will be checked by the writer or assigned to an editor. You can use this option as many times as you see fit. This is free because we want you to be completely satisfied with the service offered.

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